Clove definition

klōv
Frequency:
An evergreen tree (Syzygium aromaticum) native to the Moluccas and widely cultivated as a source of oil and for its aromatic dried flower buds.
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A segment of a bulb, as of garlic.
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A very pungent aromatic spice, the unexpanded flower bud of the clove tree.
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(botany) The tree Syzygium aromaticum (syn. Caryophyllus aromatica), native to the Moluccas (Indonesian islands) which produces the spice.
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An old English measure of weight, containing 7 pounds (3.2 kg), i.e. half a stone.
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Any one of the separate bulbs that make up the larger bulb of garlic.
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Simple past tense of cleave.
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A narrow valley with steep sides, used in areas of North America first settled by the Dutch.
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A flower bud of this plant, used whole or ground as a spice.
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One of the small sections of a separable bulb, as that of garlic.
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The dried flower bud of a tropical evergreen tree (Eugenia aromatica) of the myrtle family, originally native to the East Indies: used as a pungent, fragrant spice.
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The tree.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
clove
Plural:
cloves

Origin of clove

  • Middle English from Old French clou (de girofle) nail (of the clove tree) from Latin clāvus nail

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English clufu gleubh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • An alteration of Middle English clowe, from the first component of Old French clou de girofle, from Latin clāvus (“nail”) for its shape. Also see clāva (“knotty branch, club”)

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old English clufu, cognate with cleofan (“to split”), hence with the verbal etymology hereafter

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary