Stone meaning

stōn
(medicine) A mineral concretion in an organ, such as the kidney or gallbladder, or other body part; a calculus.
noun
3
0
The definition of a stone is a small piece of rock.

An example of a stone is an uncut diamond.

noun
3
2
A small piece of rock.
noun
2
0
A unit of weight in Great Britain, 14 pounds (6.4 kilograms).
noun
2
0
(printing) A table with a smooth surface on which page forms are composed.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
(slang) Complete, utter, thoroughgoing, etc.

A stone genius.

adjective
2
0
Relating to or made of stone.

A stone wall.

adjective
1
0
Made of stoneware or earthenware.
adjective
1
0
Complete; utter. Often used in combination.

A stone liar; stone-deaf.

adjective
1
0
Completely; utterly.

Stone cold; standing stone still.

adverb
1
0
Advertisement
To hurl or throw stones at, especially to kill with stones.
verb
1
0
To remove the stones or pits from.
verb
1
0
To furnish, fit, pave, or line with stones.
verb
1
0
To rub on or with a stone in order to polish or sharpen.
verb
1
0
(sports) To block a shot taken by (an opponent). Used of a goalie.
verb
1
0
Advertisement
(obsolete) To make hard or indifferent.
verb
1
0
A piece of rock of relatively small size.
noun
1
0
A piece of rock shaped or finished for some purpose.
  • A large, solid piece used in building; also, such pieces collectively.
  • A paving block.
  • A gravestone or memorial.
  • A boundary mark or milestone.
  • A grindstone or whetstone.
noun
1
0
Something that resembles a small stone.
  • A hailstone.
  • The stonelike seed of certain fruits, as of a date.
  • The hard endocarp and the enclosed seed of a drupe, as of a peach.
  • (archaic) A testicle.
noun
1
0
noun
1
0
Advertisement
(brit.) A unit of weight, equal to 14 pounds (6.3503 kilograms): abbrev. st.
noun
1
0
(med.) An abnormal stony mass formed in the body, esp. in a kidney or gallbladder.
noun
1
0
To throw stones at; esp., to kill by pelting with stones.
verb
1
0
To furnish, pave, line, etc. with stones.
verb
1
0
To remove the stone from (a peach, cherry, etc.)
verb
1
0
Advertisement
Of stone or stoneware.
adjective
1
0
Completely, thoroughly, etc.

Stone sober.

adverb
1
0
(person) 1902-78; U.S. architect.
proper name
1
0
(person) 1872-1946; chief justice of the U.S. (1941-46)
proper name
1
0
(person) (Mrs. Henry Brown Blackwell) 1818-93; U.S. reformer & suffragist.
proper name
1
0
Advertisement
Very, completely.

Stone-blind, stone-broke.

affix
1
0
An abnormal concretion in the body, usually formed of mineral salts and most commonly found in the gallbladder, kidney, or urinary bladder; a calculus.
noun
1
0
Rock, especially when used in construction.
1
0
The hard, woody inner layer (the endocarp) of a drupe such as a cherry or peach. Not in scientific use.
1
0
(uncountable) A hard earthen substance that can form large rocks and boulders.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A small piece of stone, a pebble.
noun
1
0
A gemstone, a jewel, especially a diamond.
noun
1
0
(UK, plural: stone) A unit of mass equal to 14 pounds. Used to measure the weights of people, animals, cheese, wool, etc. 1 stone ≈ 6.3503 kilograms.
noun
1
0
(botany) The central part of some fruits, particularly drupes; consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer.

A peach stone.

noun
1
0
(medicine) A hard, stone-like deposit.

Kidney stone.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
(board games) A playing piece made of any hard material, used in various board games such as backgammon, and go.
noun
1
0
A dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.

noun
1
0
(curling) A 42-pound, precisely shaped piece of granite with a handle attached, which is bowled down the ice.
noun
1
0
A monument to the dead; a gravestone.

noun
1
0
(dated, printing) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc. before printing; also called imposing stone.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
To pelt with stones, especially to kill by pelting with stones.

She got stoned to death after they found her.

verb
1
0
To remove a stone from (fruit etc.).
verb
1
0
(intransitive) To form a stone during growth, with reference to fruit etc.
verb
1
0
(slang) To intoxicate, especially with narcotics. (Usually in passive)
verb
1
0
Constructed of stone.

Stone walls.

adjective
1
0
Advertisement
Having the appearance of stone.

Stone pot.

adjective
1
0
Of a dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.
adjective
1
0
(African American Vernacular) Used as an intensifier.

She is one stone fox.

adjective
1
0
As a stone (used with following adjective).

My father is stone deaf. This soup is stone cold.

adverb
1
0
(slang) Absolutely, completely (used with following adjective).

I went stone crazy after she left.

adverb
1
0
Stone is the British measure of weight.

An example of stone is fourteen US pounds.

noun
1
1
Stone is defined as to throw small pieces of rock at someone.

An example of to stone is a form of execution carried out in areas of Nigeria.

verb
1
1
Rock or a piece of rock shaped or finished for a particular purpose, especially:
  • A piece of rock that is used in construction.
    A coping stone; a paving stone.
  • A gravestone or tombstone.
  • A grindstone, millstone, or whetstone.
  • A milestone or boundary.
noun
1
1
A gem or precious stone.
noun
1
1
Something, such as a hailstone, resembling a stone in shape or hardness.
noun
1
1
(botany) The hard covering enclosing the seed in certain fruits, such as the cherry, plum, or peach.
noun
1
1
The hard, solid, nonmetallic mineral matter of which rock is composed.
noun
1
1
carve in stone
  • to make official, permanent, or final
    An unsigned contract means that nothing is carved in stone yet.
idiom
0
0
cast the first stone
  • to be the first one to rebuke or punish another
idiom
0
0
leave no stone unturned
  • to search everywhere
  • to do everything possible
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of stone

  • < stone, with the sense “like or as a stone”

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English stān stāi- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stan, ston, from Old English stān, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (compare Dutch steen, German Stein), from Proto-Indo-European *st(y)oy- (compare Latin stiria (“icicle"), Russian стена (stená, “wall"), Ancient Greek στῖον (stîon, “pebble"), στέαρ (stear, “tallow"), Persian ستون (sotun, “pillar"), Albanian shtëng (“hardened or pressed matter"), Sanskrit स्त्यायते (styāyate, “it hardens")).

    From Wiktionary