Cop meaning

kŏp
A police officer.
noun
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Coptic.
abbreviation
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Cop is defined as to buy drugs, or to capture or steal.

An example of cop is to take a person's bike without asking.

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The definition of cop is a spindle of thread or yarn, or is slang for police officer.

An example of a cop is thread round around a spindle in a cone shape.

An example of a cop is a person who gives traffic tickets.

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One that regulates certain behaviors or actions.
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To take unlawfully or without permission; steal.
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A summit or crest, as of a hill.
noun
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The top or crest, as of a hill.
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A cone-shaped roll of thread or yarn coiled round a spindle.
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To seize, capture, take, win, steal, etc.
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To buy (drugs)
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A policeman.
noun
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Copyright.
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(obsolete) A spider.
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(formerly dialect, now informal) To obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take.
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To (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.

When caught, he would often cop a vicious blow from his father.

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No need to cop an attitude with me, junior.

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(intransitive, usually with "to", slang) To admit, especially to a crime.

I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?

Harold copped to being known as "Dirty Harry".

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(slang, law enforcement) A police officer or prison guard.
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(crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.
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A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
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(architecture, military) A merlon.
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initialism
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A cone-shaped or cylindrical roll of yarn or thread wound on a spindle.
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cop a feel
  • To fondle someone sexually in a surreptitious way.
idiom
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cop a plea
  • To plead guilty to a lesser charge so as to avoid standing trial for a more serious charge.
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cop a plea
  • To plead guilty to a criminal charge, esp. so as to get a lighter sentence.
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cop out
  • To confess to the police, often implicating another.
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cop to
  • To admit or acknowledge.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of cop

  • Probably variant of cap to catch from Old French caper from Latin capere capture
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English summit from Old English
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Short for copper
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English coppe, from Old English *coppe, as in ātorcoppe (“spider”, literally “venom head”), from Old English copp (“top, summit, head”), from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (“vault, round vessel, head”), from Proto-Indo-European *gū- (“to bend, curve”). Cognate with Middle Dutch koppe, kobbe (“spider”). More at cobweb.
    From Wiktionary
  • Possibly from Middle French capere (“to capture”), from Latin capere (“to seize, to grasp”); or possibly from Dutch kapen (“to steal”), from West Frisian kāpia (“to take away”), from Old Frisian kapia, to buy.
    From Wiktionary
  • Old English cop, copp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (“vault, basin, round object”), from Proto-Indo-European *gu-. Cognate with Dutch kop, German Kopf.
    From Wiktionary
  • Short for copper (“police officer”), itself from cop (“one who cops”) above, i.e. a criminal.
    From Wiktionary