Copper meaning

kŏpər
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The definition of copper is of a reddish-brown, stretchable and metallic element, or something that is reddish-brown in color.

An example of copper used as an adjective is in the phrase "copper hair," which means reddish-brownish hair.

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Copper means to cover with a reddish-brown, malleable and stretchable metallic element.

An example of copper is to dip a statue in melted copper.

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Copper is defined as a metallic element that is malleable, stretchable and reddish-brown or something of this color/metal.
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Until 1982, pennies were 95% copper; but after that, they have been made of a zinc alloy that is coated with copper, leaving the copper penny with only 2.6% copper. Nickels are 75% copper. Dimes, quarters, and half dollars are 91.67% copper.
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To sheathe or coat with copper.
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The use of copper goes back at least 10,000 years, making it our oldest metal.
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The Statue of Liberty contains 179,000 pounds of copper. It stands up to harsh weather and winds from the ocean and is still beautiful and intact.
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Its electron structure is very similar to that of gold and silver.
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A police officer.
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Copper’s abbreviation is CU for the Latin word "cuprum" and its atomic number is 29.
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Copper is soft and malleable, meaning it can be shaped or hammered easily.
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Copper is peachy-bronze in color. When it oxidizes, copper turns brown (as is the case with an older penny). The brown layer is copper oxide.
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The copper oxide will then react with water or air and form a layer of green material called a "patina" on the metal to protect the metal. The Statue of Liberty, a notable landmark of the United States, is a statue made out of copper that has oxidized.
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It is long lasting and is strong enough to be formed into wires.
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It conducts heat and electricity better than any other metal except for silver and is a part of many metal alloys.
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It is so versatile that it has been called man’s eternal metal.
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Sources of copper include chalcosite, chalcopyrite, cuprite, and azurite.
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If it is alloyed with zinc, brass is formed. If it is alloyed with tin, bronze is formed.
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Copper is essential in trace amounts in the human body to keep tissues, the heart, the immune system, and the nervous system healthy and to help the body use iron.
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Copper is antibacterial, so brass fixtures and fingerplates help prevent the spread of disease.
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Any tools that are made from copper or copper alloy will not spark; so, these are used in places where a spark would cause a fire or explosion.
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Copper is recyclable and does not lose any of its properties during the process. Half of the copper used every year comes from recycled copper.

An example of copper is the material that makes up a penny.

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A ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and is widely used for electrical wiring, water piping, and corrosion-resistant parts, either pure or in alloys such as brass and bronze. Atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.546; melting point 1,085°C; boiling point 2,562°C; specific gravity 8.96; valence 1, 2.
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A coin, usually of small denomination, made of copper or a copper alloy.
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A large cooking pot made of copper or often of iron.
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Any of various small butterflies of the subfamily Lycaeninae, having predominantly copper-colored wings.
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A reddish brown.
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To coat or finish with a layer of copper.
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To bet against, as in faro.
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A reddish-brown, malleable, ductile, metallic element that is corrosion-resistant and an excellent conductor of electricity and heat: symbol, Cu; at. no. 29
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The color of copper; reddish brown.
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Any of various small, copper-colored butterflies (family Lycaenidae) found in temperate regions.
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Of copper.
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Copper-colored; reddish-brown.
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To cover or coat with copper.
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To bet against (another's bet)
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A policeman.
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A ductile malleable metallic element with atomic number 29 that is a component of various enzymes, is used in its salt forms as an astringent, deodorant, and antifungal, and whose radioisotope is used in brain scans and for diagnosing Wilson disease.
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A reddish-brown, ductile, malleable metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. It is widely used for electrical wires, water pipes, and rust-resistant parts, either in its pure form or in alloys such as brass and bronze. Atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.546; melting point 1,083°C; boiling point 2,595°C; specific gravity 8.96; valence 1, 2.
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(Cu) A reddish-brown metal that is highly conductive and widely used for electrical wire. When a signal "runs over copper," it means that a metal wire is used rather than a glass wire (optical fiber). See copper chip.
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One of the world’s oldest known commodities and the world’s third most widely used metal, after iron and aluminum. It is used in highly cyclical industries such as construction and industrial machinery manufacturing, which ties its price direction to the state of the world economy. Chile is the world’s largest copper producer. The largest futures and options market for copper is the London Metal Exchange (LME), where a variety of copper contracts trade. Three-months copper is the benchmark issue. The name “three-month” comes from the delay that it took to ship copper mined in Chile to London when trading began on the LME. The forerunner to the LME was the Royal Exchange that began in 1571 when metals traders first began to meet on a regular basis. In 1877, the London Metal Market and Exchange Company was formed as a direct result of Britain’s industrial revolution of the 19th century. Copper futures also are traded on the Comex Division of the New York Mercan-tile Exchange, where the trading symbol is HG, as well as on other exchanges around the world.
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A reddish-brown metallic element that is highly malleable, ductile, corrosion-resistant, and is an excellent conductor of electricity and heat. Only silver is a better conductor of electricity at room temperature. Copper is extensively used in electrical cables. Copper has an atomic number of 29.
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(uncountable) A reddish-brown, malleable, ductile metallic element with high electrical and thermal conductivity, symbol Cu, and atomic number 29.
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(countable) Something made of copper.
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The reddish-brown colour/color of copper.

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(countable) A copper coin.
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(UK, archaic) A large pot, often used for heating water or washing clothes over a fire. In New Zealand at least, it could also be a fixed installation made of copper, with a fire underneath and its own chimney. Generally made redundant by the advent of the washing machine.

Mum would heat the water in a copper in the kitchen and transfer it to the tin bath.

I explain that socks can’t be boiled up in the copper with the sheets and towels or they shrink.

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Made of copper.
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Having the reddish-brown colour/color of copper.
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(slang, law enforcement) A policeman.
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Origin of copper

  • Middle English coper from Old English from Late Latin cuprum from Latin Cyprium (aes) Cyprian (metal) from Cyprius of Cyprus from Greek Kuprios from Kupros Cyprus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From cop

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English coper, from Old English coper, copor (“copper”), from Late Latin cuprum (“copper”), contraction of Latin (aes) Cyprium (literally “brass of Cyprus”), from Ancient Greek Κύπρος (Kupros, “Cyprus”). Cognate with Dutch koper (“copper”), German Kupfer (“copper”), Icelandic kopar (“copper”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From cop (verb) (“to take, capture”) +‎ -er (“agent suffix”)

    From Wiktionary