Constable meaning

kŏn'stə-bəl, kŭn'-
The definition of a constable is a law enforcement officer in a small town who has less authority than a sheriff.

A small-town police officer who patrols the streets, keeps order and who has limited authority is an example of a constable.

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A police officer.
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The warden or keeper of a royal fortress or castle.
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A police officer.
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A medieval officer of high rank, usually serving as military commander in the absence of a monarch.
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The governor of a royal castle.
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(UK, New Zealand) A police officer ranking below sergeant in most British/New Zealand police forces. (See also chief constable).
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Officer of a noble court in the middle ages, usually a senior army commander. (See also marshal).
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(US) Public officer, usually at municipal level, responsible for maintaining order or serving writs and court orders.
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(Channel Islands) A elected head of a parish (also known as a connétable)
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A peace officer with less authority and smaller jurisdiction than a sheriff, empowered to serve writs and warrants and make arrests.
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In the Middle Ages, the highest-ranking official of a royal household, court, etc.
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A peace officer in a town or village, with powers and jurisdiction somewhat more limited than those of a sheriff.
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1776-1837; Eng. landscape painter.
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Origin of constable

  • Middle English from Old French conestable from Late Latin comes stabulī officer of the stable Latin comes officer, companion ei- in Indo-European roots Latin stabulī genitive of stabulum stable stā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Old French conestable (> French connétable), from Latin comes stabulī (“officer of the stables”). For the sense-development, compare marshall.
    From Wiktionary