Hake meaning

hāk
Frequency:
Any of various gadoid marine food fishes, as the silver hake.
noun
4
0
(Now chiefly dialectal) A hook; a pot-hook.
noun
2
0
(Now chiefly dialectal) A kind of weapon; a pike.
noun
2
0
Any of various marine food fishes chiefly of the genera Merluccius and Urophycis, closely related to and resembling the cods.
noun
1
0
(Now chiefly dialectal) (in the plural) The draught-irons of a plough.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
One of several species of marine gadoid fishes, of the genera Phycis, Merluccius, and allies.
noun
0
0
A drying shed, as for unburned tile.
noun
0
0
(UK, dialect) To loiter; to sneak.
verb
0
0

Origin of hake

  • Middle English possibly from Old English haca hook (from the shape of its lower jaw) keg- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English *hake, from Old English hæca, haca (“hook, bolt, door-fastening, bar”), from Proto-Germanic *hakô (“hook”), from Proto-Indo-European *keg-, *keng- (“peg, hook”). Cognate with Dutch haak (“hook”), German Haken (“hook”), Danish hage (“hook”), Swedish hake (“hook”), Icelandic haki (“hook”), Hittite kagas (“tooth”), Middle Irish ailchaing (“weapons rack”), Lithuanian kéngė (“hook, latch”), Russian коготь (kógot', “claw”). Related to hook.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English hake, probably a shortened form (due to Scandinavian influence) of English dialectal haked (“pike”). Compare Norwegian hakefisk (“trout, salmon”), Middle Low German haken (“kipper”). More at haked.

    From Wiktionary