Plough meaning

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Plough is another word for plow, which is a farm tool with heavy blades that cuts through the soil.

A farm tool with heavy blades is an example of a plough.

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An alternative name for Ursa Major or the Great Bear.
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A carucate of land; a ploughland.
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(literary or historical in the United States) A device pulled through the ground in order to break it open into furrows for planting.

The horse-drawn plough had a tremendous impact on agriculture.

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A joiner's plane for making grooves.
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A bookbinder's implement for trimming or shaving off the edges of books.
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To use a plough on to prepare for planting.

I've still got to plough that field.

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(intransitive) To use a plough.

Some days I have to plough from sunrise to sunset.

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(vulgar) To have sex with.
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To move with force.
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To furrow; to make furrows, grooves, or ridges in; to run through, as in sailing.
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(bookbinding) To trim, or shave off the edges of, as a book or paper, with a plough.
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(joinery) To cut a groove in, as in a plank, or the edge of a board; especially, a rectangular groove to receive the end of a shelf or tread, the edge of a panel, a tongue, etc.
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(astronomy, UK) The common name for the brightest seven stars of the constellation Ursa Major.
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Origin of plough

  • From Middle English plouh, plow, plugh(e), plough(e), plouw, from Old English plōh (“hide of land, ploughland") and Old Norse plógr (“plough (the implement)"), both from Proto-Germanic *plōgaz, *plōguz (“plough"). Cognate with Scots pleuch, plou (“plough"), West Frisian ploech (“plough"), North Frisian plog (“plough"), Dutch ploeg (“plough"), Low German Ploog (“plough"), German Pflug (“plough"), Danish plov (“plough"), Swedish and Norwegian plog (“plough"), Icelandic plógur (“plough"). Replaced Old English sulh (“plough, furrow"); see sullow.
    From Wiktionary