Wagon meaning

wăgən
Frequency:
A four-wheeled, usually horse-drawn vehicle with a large rectangular body, used for transporting loads.
noun
5
1
A small table or tray on wheels used for serving drinks or food.

A dessert wagon.

noun
2
1
The Big Dipper.
noun
1
1
(chiefly british) An open railway freight car.
noun
1
1
Any of various types of four-wheeled vehicles.
  • A horse-drawn vehicle for hauling heavy loads.
  • A small cart pulled or steered by means of a pole handle and used by children in play.
noun
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(brit.) A railroad freight car.
noun
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To carry or transport (goods) by wagon; move or go in a wagon.
verb
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A four-wheeled cart for hauling loads.
noun
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0
A freight car on a railway.
noun
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0
A child's riding toy, four-wheeled and pulled or steered by a long handle in the front.
noun
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(US, Australia, slang) A station wagon (SUV).
noun
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(slang) A paddy wagon.
noun
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A truck, or lorry.
noun
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(Ireland, slang, dated, derogatory) A derogatory term for a woman; bitch; slapper; cow.
noun
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To transport by means of a wagon.
verb
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(intransitive) To travel in a wagon.
verb
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A child's low, four-wheeled cart hauled by a long handle that governs the direction of the front wheels.
noun
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1
To transport or undergo transportation by wagon.
verb
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1
(slang) off the wagon
  • No longer abstaining from alcoholic beverages.
idiom
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(slang) on the wagon
  • Abstaining from alcoholic beverages.
idiom
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fix someone's wagon
  • to hurt someone in some way so as to be revenged for a wrong, insult, etc.
idiom
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hitch one's wagon to a star
  • to aspire to lofty goals; aim high
idiom
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0
on (or off) the wagon
  • no longer (or once again) drinking alcoholic liquors
idiom
0
0
the Wagon
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of wagon

  • Middle English waggin from Middle Dutch wagen wegh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Dutch wagen, waghen, from Proto-Germanic *wagnaz. Compare the inherited doublet wain.

    From Wiktionary