Compel meaning

kəm-pĕl'
To force or constrain, as to do something.
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To compel is to force someone do something or make something happen.

An example of compel is when you argue until someone agrees to give in.

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To force (a person) to do something; drive or constrain.

The court compelled the company to pay full restitution. My conscience compels me to speak out.

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To necessitate or require, as by force of circumstance; demand.

Growing riots compelled the evacuation of the embassy.

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To get or bring about by force.
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To gather or drive together by force, as a flock.
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Logic compels the wise, while fools feel compelled by emotions.

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To exact, extort, (make) produce by force.
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Tennyson.

I compel all creatures to my will.

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To exert a strong, irresistible force on; sway.
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(archaic, literally) To drive together, round up.
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Origin of compel

  • Middle English compellen from Latin compellere com- com- pellere to drive pel-5 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English compellen, from Middle French compellir, from Latin compellere, itself from com- (“together”) + pellere (“to drive”). Displaced native Middle English fordriven ("to drive out, to lead to, to compel, to force"). More at fordrive.
    From Wiktionary