Enforce meaning

ĕn-fôrs
To bring about or impose by force.

To enforce one's will on a child.

verb
7
2
To compel observance of (a law, etc.)
verb
5
2
To compel observance of or obedience to.

Enforce a law.

verb
4
2
To keep up, impose or bring into effect something, not necessarily by force. [from 17th c.]

The police are there to enforce the law.

verb
3
0
To prove; to evince.

verb
2
0
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To give strength or force to; to affirm, to emphasize. [from 15th c.]

The victim was able to enforce his evidence against the alleged perpetrator.

verb
1
1
To give force to; urge.

To enforce an argument by analogies.

verb
1
2
To enforce is described as to compel someone to abide by a rule, law or order.

When the police compel you to obey speed limits or else get a ticket, this is an example of a situation where the police enforce the law.

verb
0
1
To give force to; reinforce.
verb
0
1
(archaic) To compel, oblige (someone or something); to force. [from 16th c.]
verb
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1
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To impose (a kind of behavior, for example).

Enforce military discipline.

verb
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2

Origin of enforce

  • Middle English enforcen from Old French enforcier to exert force, compel, and from enforcir to strengthen en- causative pref. en–1 force strength force

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French enforcier, from Late Latin infortiāre, from in- + fortis (“strong”).

    From Wiktionary