Execute meaning

ĕksĭ-kyo͝ot
To execute is defined as to carry out, perform or put to death.

An example of to execute is completing a plan of action.

An example of to execute is to run a computer program.

An example of to execute is a prisoner on death row being given a legal injection to end their life.

verb
3
1
To perform or carry out what is required by.

Execute the terms of a will.

verb
3
1
To run (a program or instruction).
verb
2
1
To perform (a piece of music, a part in a play, etc.)
verb
1
0
To perform the operations indicated in (an instruction or program)
verb
1
0
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To sign a contract, will, or other legal document; to carry out a duty; to recover funds under a judgment; to put a criminal defendant to death.
verb
1
0
To kill as punishment for capital crimes.

There are certain states where it is lawful to execute prisoners convicted of certain crimes.

verb
1
0
To make valid, as by signing.

Execute a deed.

verb
1
1
To put to death, especially by carrying out a lawful sentence.
verb
1
1
To complete or make valid (a deed, contract, etc.) as by signing, sealing, and delivering.
verb
1
1
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To run an instruction or program.
verb
1
1
To run a program, which causes the computer to carry out its instructions. See executable code, instruction and EXE file.
1
1
To put into effect; carry out.

A government that executes the decisions of the ruling party.

verb
0
0
To perform; do.

Execute a U-turn.

verb
0
0
To create (a work of art, for example) in accordance with a prescribed design.
verb
0
0
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To follow out or carry out; do; perform; fulfill.

To execute another's orders.

verb
0
0
To carry into effect; administer (laws, etc.)
verb
0
0
To put to death as in accordance with a legally imposed sentence.
verb
0
0
To create or produce in accordance with an idea, plan, blueprint, etc.

To execute a statue in marble.

verb
0
0
To carry out; to put into effect.

Your orders have been executed, sir!

I'll execute your orders as soon as this meeting is adjourned.

verb
0
0
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To execute a difficult piece of music brilliantly.

To execute a turn in ballet.

verb
0
0
To cause to become legally valid; as, to execute a contract.
verb
0
0
(computing) To start, launch or run; as, to execute a program.
verb
0
0

Origin of execute

  • Middle English executen from Old French executer from Medieval Latin execūtāre from Latin execūtor executor from execūtus past participle of exequī, exsequī to pursue, carry out ex- ex- sequī to follow sekw-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French executer (French exécuter), from Latin exsecutus, past participle of exsequor, from ex- (“out”) + sequor (“to follow”).

    From Wiktionary