Enjoin meaning

ĕn-join
To urge or impose with authority; order; enforce.

To enjoin silence on a class.

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To prohibit or forbid.

The judge enjoined the merger of the firms. The court enjoined the company from merging with its competitor.

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To prohibit, esp. by legal injunction; forbid.

The company was enjoined from using false advertising.

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To order (someone) authoritatively to do something, esp. by legal injunction.
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To order or compel to stop or prohibit commencement of an activity; of a judge: to grant a court order directing a party to cease a particular activity.
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(chiefly literary) To lay upon, as an order or command; to give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order; to charge.
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(law) To prohibit or restrain by a judicial order or decree; to put an injunction on.
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Enjoin is defined as to order someone to do something or to prohibit someone from doing something.

When the court issues an injunction stopping you from revealing trade secrets, this is an example of a time when the court enjoins.

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Origin of enjoin

  • Middle English enjoinen from Old French enjoindre from Latin iniungere in- causative pref. en–1 iungere to join yeug- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French enjoindre (“to join with”), from Latin iniungo (“to attach”), a compound of in- (“into” “upon”) and iungo.

    From Wiktionary