Put meaning

po͝ot
Frequency:
To assign; attribute.

They put a false interpretation on events.

verb
6
1
To cause (one) to undergo something; subject.

The interrogators put the prisoner to torture.

verb
5
2
To impose or levy.

The governor has put a tax on cigarettes.

verb
5
3
To estimate.

We put the time at five o'clock.

verb
4
3
(nautical) To proceed.

The ship put into the harbor.

verb
1
0
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(sports) An act of putting the shot.
noun
1
0
An option to sell a stipulated amount of stock or securities within a specified time and at a fixed price.
noun
1
0
Fixed; stationary.

Stay put.

adjective
1
0
To cause to be in a certain position or place; place; set.

Put the box here.

verb
1
0
To impose.

Put a tax on luxuries.

verb
1
0
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To attribute; assign; ascribe.

To put the blame where it belongs.

verb
1
0
To express; state.

Put it in plain language.

verb
1
0
To translate.
verb
1
0
To present for consideration, decision, etc.

To put the question.

verb
1
0
To adapt or fit (words) to music.
verb
1
0
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To take one's course; move; go (in, out, back, etc.)
verb
1
0
A cast or thrust; esp., the act of putting the shot.
noun
1
0
An option to sell a given quantity of a stock, commodity, etc. at a specified price and within a specified time: puts are purchased in anticipation of, or to protect against, a decline in the price of the stock, commodity, etc.
noun
1
0
(informal) Immovable; fixed.

Stay put.

adjective
1
0
In programming, a request to store the current record in an output file. Contrast with get.
1
0
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An option that gives the holder the right to sell the underlying security at a specified price during a set time period.
1
0
To place something somewhere.

She put her books on the table.

verb
1
0
To bring or set into a certain relation, state or condition.

Put your house in order!

He is putting all his energy into this one task.

She tends to put herself in dangerous situations.

verb
1
0
(finance) To exercise a put option.

He got out of his Procter and Gamble bet by putting his shares at 80.

verb
1
0
Put is defined as to place something or cause something to happen.

An example of put is to lay a book on the shelves.

An example of put is to cause an issue to be voted upon.

verb
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0
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(games) To wager (a stake); bet.

Put $50 on a horse.

verb
0
0
(sports) To hurl with an overhand pushing motion.

Put the shot.

verb
0
0
To bring up for consideration or judgment.

Put a question to the judge.

verb
0
0
To express; state.

I put my objections bluntly.

verb
0
0
To render in a specified language or literary form.

Put prose into verse.

verb
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0
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To adapt.

The lyrics had been put to music.

verb
0
0
To urge or force to an action.

A mob that put the thief to flight.

verb
0
0
To apply.

We must put our minds to it.

verb
0
0
To force the purchase of (a stock or commodity) by exercising a put option.
verb
0
0
To begin to move, especially in a hurry.
verb
0
0
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To express something in a certain manner.

When you put it that way, I guess I can see your point.

verb
0
0
(athletics) To throw a heavy iron ball, as a sport. (See shot put. Do not confuse with putt.)
verb
0
0
To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
verb
0
0
To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
verb
0
0
To attach or attribute; to assign.

To put a wrong construction on an act or expression.

verb
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0
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To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention.

To put a question; to put a case.

verb
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0
Sir Walter Scott.

Put me not to use the carnal weapon in my own defence.

verb
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0
Milton.

Thank him who puts me, loath, to this revenge.

verb
0
0
(mining) To convey coal in the mine, as for example from the working to the tramway.

verb
0
0
(business) A right to sell something at a predetermined price.
noun
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0
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(finance) A contract to sell a security at a set price on or before a certain date.

He bought a January '08 put for Procter and Gamble at 80 to hedge his bet.

noun
0
0
The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push.

The put of a ball.

noun
0
0
An old card game.

noun
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0
F. Harrison.

What droll puts the citizens seem in it all.

noun
0
0
1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 244.

The old put wanted to make a parson of me, but d"”n me, thinks I to myself, I'll nick you there, old cull; the devil a smack of your nonsense shall you ever get into me.

noun
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0
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(obsolete) A prostitute.
noun
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0
(software, testing) Acronym of Parameterized Unit Testing.
acronym
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0
To place in a specified location; set.

She put the books on the table.

verb
0
1
To cause to be in a specified condition.

His gracious manners put me at ease.

verb
0
1
put an end
  • To bring to an end; terminate.
idiom
0
0
put down roots
  • To establish a permanent residence in a locale.
idiom
0
0
put in an appearance
  • To attend a social engagement, especially for a short time.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put it to (someone)
  • To overburden with tasks or work.
  • To put blame on.
  • To take unfair advantage of.
  • To lay out the facts of a situation to (another) in a forceful candid manner.
  • To defeat soundly; trounce.
idiom
0
0
put (one) in mind
  • To remind:
    You put me in mind of your grandmother.
idiom
0
0
put (oneself) out
  • To make a considerable effort; go to trouble or expense.
idiom
0
0
put (one's) finger on
  • To identify:
    I can't put my finger on the person in that photograph.
idiom
0
0
put (one's) foot down
  • To take a firm stand.
idiom
0
0
put (one's) foot in (one's) mouth
  • To make a tactless remark.
idiom
0
0
(chiefly british) put paid to
  • To finish off; put to rest:
idiom
0
0
put (someone) in (someone's) place
  • To lower the dignity of (someone); humble.
idiom
0
0
put (someone) through (someone's) paces
  • To cause to demonstrate ability or skill; test:
    The drama coach put her students through their paces before the first performance.
idiom
0
0
put (someone) up to
  • To cause to commit a funny, mischievous, or malicious act:
    My older brother put me up to making a prank telephone call.
idiom
0
0
put something over on
  • To deceive, cheat, or trick.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put the arm
  • To ask another for money.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put the finger on
  • To inform on:
    The witness put the finger on the killer.
idiom
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0
put the lie to
  • To show to be false or inaccurate.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put the make
  • To make sexual advances to.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put the screws to
  • To pressure (another) in an extreme manner.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put the skids on
  • To bring to a halt:
idiom
0
0
(informal) put to bed
  • To make final preparations for the printing of (a newspaper, for example).
  • To make final preparations for completing (a project).
idiom
0
0
put to it
  • To cause extreme difficulty for:
    We were put to it to finish the book on time.
idiom
0
0
put to sleep
  • To make weary; bore.
  • To subject to euthanasia.
  • To subject to general anesthesia.
idiom
0
0
put two and two together
  • To draw the proper conclusions from existing evidence or indications.
idiom
0
0
(slang) put up or shut up
  • To have to endure (something unpleasant) without complaining or take the action necessary to remove the source of the unpleasantry.
idiom
0
0
put up with
  • To endure without complaint:
    We had to put up with the inconvenience.
idiom
0
0
put about
  • to change the course of (a sailing vessel) to another tack
  • to move in another direction
idiom
0
0
(informal) put across
  • to cause to be understood or accepted
  • to carry out with success
  • to carry out by trickery
idiom
0
0
put ahead
  • to reset the hands of (a clock) to a later time
idiom
0
0
put aside
  • to reserve for later use
  • to give up; discard
idiom
0
0
put away
  • to consign to a jail, mental hospital, etc.
  • to consume (food or drink)
idiom
0
0
put back
  • to replace
  • to reset the hands of (a clock) to an earlier time
  • to demote (a pupil)
idiom
0
0
put down
  • to write down; record
  • to attribute (to)
  • to consider as; classify
  • to land or make a landing in an aircraft
  • to belittle, reject, criticize, or humiliate
idiom
0
0
put forth
  • to grow (leaves, shoots, etc.)
  • to bring into action; exert
  • to propose; offer
  • to bring out; publish; circulate
  • to leave a port
idiom
0
0
put forward
  • to advance or present (a plan, etc.)
idiom
0
0
put in
  • to enter a port or harbor
  • to enter (a claim, request, etc.)
  • to interpose; insert
  • to spend (time) in a specified manner
idiom
0
0
put in for
  • to request or apply for
idiom
0
0
put it on
  • to make a pretentious show; pretend or exaggerate
idiom
0
0
put it over on
  • to deceive; trick
idiom
0
0
put it there!
  • shake hands with me
idiom
0
0
put off
  • to leave until later; postpone; delay
  • to discard
  • to evade; divert
  • to displease or offend
idiom
0
0
put on
  • to clothe, adorn, or cover oneself with
  • to take on; add
    To put on a few pounds.
  • to assume or pretend
  • to apply (a brake, etc.)
  • to stage (a play)
idiom
0
0
put someone on
  • to fool someone by playing on that person's credulity; hoax
idiom
0
0
put someone on to
  • to inform someone about
idiom
0
0
put out
  • to expel; dismiss
  • to extinguish (a fire or light)
  • to spend (money)
  • to disconcert; confuse
  • to distress; ruffle; vex
  • to inconvenience
  • to engage in sexual intercourse, often promiscuously
  • to cause (a batter or runner) to be out by a fielding play
idiom
0
0
put over
idiom
1
0
put something over on
  • to deceive; trick
idiom
0
1
put paid to
  • to put an end to; terminate
idiom
0
1
put through
  • to perform successfully; carry out
  • to cause to do or undergo
  • to connect (someone) by telephone with someone else
idiom
0
1
put to it
  • to place in a difficult situation; press hard
idiom
1
0
put up
  • to offer, as for consideration, decision, auction, etc.
  • to offer as a candidate
  • to preserve or can (fruits, vegetables, etc.)
  • to erect; build
  • to lodge, or provide lodgings for
  • to arrange (the hair) with curlers, bobby pins, etc.
  • to carry on
    To put up a struggle.
  • to incite (a person) to some action
  • to sheathe (one's sword)
idiom
1
0
put upon
  • to impose on; victimize
idiom
0
0
put up with
  • to bear or suffer patiently; tolerate
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

put an end
put it to (someone)
put (one) in mind
put (oneself) out
put (someone) in (someone's) place
put (someone) through (someone's) paces
put (someone) up to
put something over on
put the arm
put the finger on
put the make
put the screws to
put the skids on
put to it
put in for
put it on
put it over on
put someone on
put someone on to
put something over on
put to it

Origin of put

  • Middle English putten back-formation from Old English pūtte past tense of pȳtan to put out

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English putten, puten, poten, from Old English *putian, *pÅ«tian ("to push, put out"; attested by derivative putung (“pushing, impulse, instigation, urging")) and potian (“to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad"), both from Proto-Germanic *putōnÄ… (“to stick, stab"), from Proto-Indo-European *bud- (“to shoot, sprout"). Compare also related Old English pȳtan (“to push, poke, thrust, put out (the eyes)"). Cognate with Dutch poten (“to set, plant"), Danish putte (“to put"), Swedish putta, pötta, potta (“to strike, knock, push gently, shove, put away"), Norwegian putte (“to set, put"), Norwegian pota (“to poke"), Icelandic pota (“to poke"), Dutch peuteren (“to pick, poke around, dig, fiddle with"), Sanskrit [script?] (bunda, “arrow").

    From Wiktionary

  • Origin unknown. Perhaps related to Welsh pwt.

    From Wiktionary

  • Old French pute.

    From Wiktionary