Felon meaning

fĕlən
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The definition of a felon is a person who has been convicted of a felony (a serious crime for which the penalty is normally one or more years of incarceration).

Someone who has been found guilty of felony murder is an example of a felon.

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A painful purulent infection at the end of a finger or toe in the area surrounding the nail.
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A painful abscess or infection at the end of a finger or toe, near the nail; whitlow.
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A painful purulent infection at the end of a finger or toe in the area surrounding the nail.
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(medicine) A bacterial infection at the end of a finger or toe.
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(law) One who has committed a felony.
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(archaic) An evil person.
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Evil; cruel.
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(obs.) A villain.
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(law) A person guilty of a major crime; criminal.
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(old poet.) Wicked; base; criminal.
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An individual previously convicted of a felony.
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A person who has committed a felony.
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(law) A person who has been tried and convicted of a felony.
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Origin of felon

  • Middle English feloun from Old French felon wicked, a wicked person from Medieval Latin fellō fellōn- possibly of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English feloun probably from Latin fel gall, bile ghel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English felun, feloun, from Anglo-Norman felun (“traitor, wretch”), from Frankish *felo (“wicked person”), from Proto-Germanic *fillô, *filjô (“flayer, whipper, scoundrel”), from Proto-Germanic *faluz (“cruel, evil”) (compare English fell (“fierce”), Middle High German vālant (“imp”)), related to *fellaną (compare Dutch villen, German fillen (“to whip, beat”), both from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂- (“to stir, move, swing”) (compare Old Irish adellaim 'I seek', diellaim 'I yield', Umbrian pelsatu 'to overcome, conquer', Latin pellere (“to drive, beat”), Latvian lijuôs, plītiês (“to force, impose”), Ancient Greek πέλας (pélas, “near”), πίλναμαι (pílnamai, “I approach”), Old Armenian հալածեմ (halacem, “I pursue”).

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from Latin fel (“gall, poison”).

    From Wiktionary