Dove meaning

dŭv
Frequency:
A gentle, innocent person.
noun
13
5
A person who advocates peace, conciliation, or negotiation in preference to confrontation or armed conflict.
noun
10
4
Any of various widely distributed birds of the family Columbidae, which includes the pigeons, having a small head and a characteristic cooing call.
noun
9
3
The definition of a dove is a small white pigeon used as a symbol for peace, or a person who wants peace.

An example of a dove is a little white bird with a round body, small head and short legs that makes cooing sounds.

An example of a dove is a congressperson who does not want the U. S. to go to war.

noun
7
4
Constellation in the Southern Hemisphere near Caelum and Puppis.
pronoun
5
6
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verb
3
3
(chiefly North America and English dialect) Strong-declension simple past tense of dive.
verb
3
3
Pigeon, esp. the smaller species: it is often used as a symbol of peace.
noun
2
3
An advocate of measures in international affairs designed to avoid or reduce open hostilities.
noun
2
3
A person regarded as gentle, innocent, or beloved.
noun
2
3
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A pigeon, especially one smaller in size; a bird (often arbitrarily called either a pigeon or a dove or both) of more than 300 species of the family Columbidae.
noun
2
3
(politics) A person favouring conciliation and negotiation rather than conflict (as opposed to hawk).
noun
2
3
Term of endearment for one regarded as pure and gentle.
noun
2
3
(nonstandard) Past participle of dive.
verb
2
4

Origin of dove

  • Middle English douve from Old English dūfe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dove, douve, duve, from Old English *dūfe (“dove, pigeon”), from Proto-Germanic *dūbǭ (“dove”), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeubʰ- (“to whisk, smoke, be obscure”). Cognate with Scots doo, dow (“dove”), West Frisian do (“dove”), Dutch duif (“dove, pigeon”), Low German (Low Saxon) Duuv (“dove, pigeon”), German Taube (“dove, pigeon”), Danish due (“dove”), Swedish duva (“dove”), Icelandic dúfa (“dove”), Gothic (dubo).

    From Wiktionary

  • A modern dialectal formation of the strong declension, by analogy with drivedrove and weavewove.

    From Wiktionary