Weave meaning

wēv
To weave is to interlace pieces of something together.

An example of weave is when you interlace yarn together on a loom to make a blanket.

verb
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To introduce (another element) into a complex whole; work in.

Wove folk tunes into the symphony.

verb
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A type or way of weaving.

That rug has a very tight weave.

noun
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To construct by interlacing or interweaving strips or strands of material.

Weave a basket.

verb
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To attach hair extensions to (hair).
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To make (a path or way) by winding in and out or from side to side.

Weaved our way through the heavy traffic.

verb
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To move in and out or sway from side to side.
verb
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The pattern, method of weaving, or construction of a fabric.

A twill weave; a loose weave.

noun
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A hairstyle in which hair extensions are attached to existing strands of hair.
noun
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To twist or interlace (something) into, through, or among.

To weave flowers into one's hair.

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To make or spin (a web)
verb
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To do weaving; make cloth.
verb
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To move from side to side or in and out.

Weaving through traffic.

verb
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A method, manner, or pattern of weaving.

A cloth of English weave.

noun
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The interlacing of strands of natural or synthetic hair with a person's own hair, as to create a longer or fuller style.
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To form something by passing lengths or strands of material over and under one another.

This loom weaves yarn into sweaters.

verb
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To spin a cocoon or a web.

Spiders weave beautiful but deadly webs.

verb
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To unite by close connection or intermixture.
verb
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To compose creatively and intricately; to fabricate.

To weave the plot of a story.

verb
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Human or artificial hair worn to alter one's appearance, either in addition to or by covering the natural hair altogether.
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(quantum mechanics)
noun
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(intransitive) To move by turning and twisting.

The drunk weaved into another bar.

verb
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To make (a path or way) by winding in and out or from side to side.

The ambulance weaved its way through the heavy traffic.

verb
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To spin (a web, for example).
verb
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Origin of weave

  • Middle English weven from Old English wefan webh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English wefan, from Proto-Germanic *webanÄ…, from Proto-Indo-European *webÊ°- (“to weave, braid"). Cognate with West Frisian weve, Dutch weven, German weben, Danish væve, Swedish väva.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from Old Norse veifa "˜move around, wave', related to Latin vibrare.

    From Wiktionary