Match meaning

măch
To provide with an adversary or competitor.

The tournament matches the best offensive team with the best defensive team.

verb
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3
A marriage or an arrangement of marriage.

A royal match.

noun
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To provide funds so as to equal or complement.

The government will match all private donations to the museum.

verb
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2
To pair (someone) with another in a romantic relationship or marriage.

She was hoping to match her cousin with her neighbor.

verb
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To place in opposition or competition; pit.

She matched her skill against all comers.

verb
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To do as well as or better than in competition; equal.

She easily matches me in bicycle racing.

verb
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To set in comparison; compare.

Beauty that could never be matched.

verb
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To flip or toss (coins) and compare the sides that land face up.
verb
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To couple (electric circuits) by means of a transformer.
verb
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To find or produce a counterpart to.

It's difficult to match the color of old paint.

verb
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2
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Match is defined as a small thin piece of wood or cardboard tipped with flammable chemicals that catch fire with friction.

An example of match is what someone would use to light a candle.

noun
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The definition of a match is a person or thing that is similar, equal to or suitable for another or a game or contest.

An example of match is a shirt and jeans that are the same color of black.

An example of match is two people with a similar sense of humor.

An example of match is two people playing cribbage.

noun
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To be exactly like another; correspond exactly.

Do the two socks match?

verb
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To harmonize with another.

Does this tie match my shirt?

verb
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A narrow piece of material, usually wood or cardboard, coated on one end with a compound that ignites when scratched against a rough or chemically treated surface.
noun
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(historical) A wick or cord prepared to burn at a uniform rate, used for firing guns or explosives.
noun
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A slender piece of wood, cardboard, waxed cord, etc. tipped with a composition that catches fire by friction; esp., a safety match.
noun
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Any person or thing equal or similar to another in some way.
  • A person, group, or thing able to cope with or oppose another as an equal in power, size, etc.
    To meet one's match.
  • A counterpart or facsimile.
  • Either of two corresponding things or persons; one of a pair.
noun
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Two or more persons or things that go together in appearance, size, or other quality.

A purse and shoes that are a good match.

noun
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A contest or game involving two or more contestants; specif., a series of usually three sets in tennis.
noun
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A person regarded as a suitable or possible mate.
noun
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To put in opposition (with); pit (against)
verb
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To be equal, similar, suitable, or corresponding to in some way.

His looks match his character.

verb
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To make, show, produce, or get a competitor, counterpart, or equivalent to.

To match a piece of cloth.

verb
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To suit or fit (one thing) to another.
verb
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To fit (things) together; make similar or corresponding.
verb
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To compare.
verb
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To be equal, similar, suitable, or corresponding in some way.
verb
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(obs.) To mate.
verb
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To compare. An equal comparison.
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(sports) A competitive sporting event such as a boxing meet, a baseball game, or a cricket match.

My local team are playing in a match against their arch-rivals today.

noun
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Any contest or trial of strength or skill, or to determine superiority.
noun
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Someone with a measure of an attribute equaling or exceeding the object of comparison.

He knew he had met his match.

noun
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noun
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A candidate for matrimony; one to be gained in marriage.
noun
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noun
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noun
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Equality of conditions in contest or competition.
noun
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A pair of items or entities with mutually suitable characteristics.

The carpet and curtains are a match.

noun
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noun
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(metalworking) A perforated board, block of plaster, hardened sand, etc., in which a pattern is partly embedded when a mould is made, for giving shape to the surfaces of separation between the parts of the mould.
noun
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(intransitive) To agree, to be equal, to correspond to.

Their interests didn't match, so it took a long time to agree what to do together.

These two copies are supposed to be identical, but they don't match.

verb
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To make a successful match or pairing.

They found out about his color-blindness when he couldn't match socks properly.

verb
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To equal or exceed in achievement.

She matched him at every turn: anything he could do, she could do as well or better.

verb
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Addison.

A senator of Rome survived, / Would not have matched his daughter with a king.

verb
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To fit together, or make suitable for fitting together; specifically, to furnish with a tongue and groove at the edges.

To match boards.

verb
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Device made of wood or paper, at the tip coated with chemicals that ignite with the friction of being dragged (struck) against a rough dry surface.

He struck a match and lit his cigarette.

noun
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One that is able to compete equally with another.

The boxer had met his match.

noun
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1
A person viewed as a prospective marriage partner.
noun
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1
To adapt or suit so that a balanced or harmonious result is achieved; cause to correspond.

You should match your deeds to your beliefs.

verb
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An easily ignited cord or wick, formerly used to detonate powder charges or to fire cannons and muzzle-loading firearms.
noun
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1
match up
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
match
Plural:
matches

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

match up

Origin of match

  • Middle English mecche, macche lamp wick from Anglo-Norman meche, mesche perhaps ultimately from Latin myxa a lamp's nozzle from Greek muxa mucus, lamp wick

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English macche from Old English gemæcca companion, mate mag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French meiche, from Vulgar Latin micca (compare Catalan metxa, Spanish mecha, Italian miccia), which in turn is probably from Latin myxa (“nozzle", "curved part of a lamp"), from Ancient Greek [Greek?] (myxa, “lamp wick")

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English macche, from Old English mæcca, from gemæcca (“companion, mate, wife, one suited to another")

    From Wiktionary