Coax meaning

kōks
To persuade or try to persuade by pleading or flattery; cajole.
verb
17
7
To obtain by persistent persuasion.

Coaxed the secret out of the child.

verb
10
7
A coaxial cable.
noun
7
5
A coaxial cable.
noun
7
6
To induce or try to induce to do something; (seek to) persuade by soothing words, an ingratiating manner, etc.; wheedle.
verb
1
2
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(obsolete) To caress; fondle.
verb
1
4
The definition of coax means to try to get someone or something to do something with gentle urging.

Using compliments to talk a friend into taking a dance class with you is an example of to coax.

Unclogging a drain with a plunger is an example of to coax.

verb
0
0
0
0
To wheedle, persuade (a person, organisation, animal etc.) gradually or by use of flattery to do something.

He coaxed the horse gently into the trailer.

verb
0
0
To carefully manipulate into a particular desired state, situation or position.

They coaxed the rope through the pipe.

verb
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0
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(obsolete) A simpleton; a dupe.

noun
0
0
Shortened form of coaxial cable.
noun
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0
To get by coaxing.
verb
0
1
To use gentle persuasion, urging, etc.
verb
0
1
adjective
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1
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0
1
To move to or adjust toward a desired end.
verb
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2
To use persuasion or inducement.
verb
0
2

Origin of coax

  • Obsolete cokes to fool from cokes fool

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • originally (1586) in the slang phrase to make a coax of, from earlier noun coax, cox, cokes "fool, simpleton", itself of obscure origin, perhaps related to cock (male bird, pert boy). The modern spelling is from 1706.

    From Wiktionary

  • Shortened from coaxial

    From Wiktionary