Flatter meaning

flătər
To please or gratify the vanity of.
verb
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1
To practice flattery.
verb
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A smith's forging tool with a broad, flat face.
noun
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To try to please, or ingratiate oneself with, by praise and attention.
verb
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To praise too much, untruly, or insincerely, as in order to win favor.
verb
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Flatter is defined as to praise or compliment.

An example of flatter is to tell someone that she looks pretty today.

verb
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A flat-faced swage or hammer used by blacksmiths.
noun
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A die plate for flattening metal into strips, as in the manufacture of watch springs.
noun
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To make seem better or more attractive than is so.

His portrait flatters him.

verb
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To make feel pleased or honored; gratify the vanity of.

It's flattering to be remembered.

verb
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To please or gratify (the eye, ear, senses, etc.)
verb
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To encourage, esp. falsely.
verb
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adjective
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A type of set tool used by blacksmiths.
noun
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A flat-faced fulling hammer.
noun
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A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing flat strips such as watch springs.
noun
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Someone who flattens, purposely or accidently. Also flattener.
noun
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Comparative form of flat: more flat.
adjective
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To compliment someone, often insincerely and sometimes to win favour.
verb
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To enhance someone's vanity by praising them.
verb
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To portray something to advantage.

Her portrait flatters her.

verb
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To convey notions of the facts that are believed to be favorable to the hearer without certainty of the truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
verb
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To compliment excessively and often insincerely, especially in order to win favor.
verb
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1
To use flattery.
verb
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A person who flattens something.
noun
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A drawplate for forming flat strips.
noun
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flatter oneself
  • to hold the self-satisfying or self-deluding belief (that)
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

flatter oneself

Origin of flatter

  • Middle English flateren from Old French flater of Germanic origin plat- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French flatter (“to flatter, to caress with the flat of the hand”), from Old French flater (“to deceive by concealing the truth, to stroke with the palm of the hand”), from Frankish *flat (“palm, flat of the hand”), from Proto-Germanic *flatą, *flatō (“palm, sole”), *flataz (“flat”), from Proto-Indo-European *plÁt-, *pele-, *plet-, *plāk- (“flat, broad, plain”). Cognate with Old High German flazza (“palm, flat of the hand”), Old High German flaz (“level, flat”), Old Saxon flat (“flat”), Old Norse flatr (“flat”) (whence English flat), Old Frisian flet, flette (“dwelling, house”), Old English flet, flett (“ground floor, dwelling”). More at flat.

    From Wiktionary

  • flat +‎ -er

    From Wiktionary