Soap meaning

sōp
A substance used with water to produce suds for washing or cleaning: soaps are usually sodium or potassium salts of fatty acids, produced by the action of an alkali, as caustic soda or potash, on fats or oils.
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The most popular alternatives that exist are vegetable and castile soaps. These soaps are made from the oils of plants and vegetables and are much less harmful on the environment.
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Fragrances in soaps are chemically-made rather than being the extract of any flower.
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Most anti-bacterial soaps have been shown to contain MIT, or methylisothiazolinone, and many contain Triclosan, a chemical registered with the EPA as a pesticide and is quite similar in composition as Agent Orange which causes nerve damage in both animals and people.
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The Centers for Disease Control indicate that the use of anti-bacterial soap is not necessary to control the spread of bacteria. Simply washing your hands with every day soap is sufficient to loosen bacteria from the skin and, once loosened, the bacteria will simply wash away upon rinsing your hands.

An example of soap is the bar sitting next to a bathroom sink used for washing hands.

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A cleansing agent, manufactured in bars, granules, flakes, or liquid form, made from a mixture of the sodium salts of various fatty acids of natural oils and fats.
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A metallic salt of a fatty acid, as of aluminum or iron, that is not water soluble and may be used as a lubricant, thickener, or in various coating applications, ointments, or disinfectants.
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Money, especially that which is used for bribery.
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A soap opera.
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To treat or cover with or as if with soap.
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Any metallic salt of a fatty acid.
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To lather, scrub, etc. with soap.
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A substance used for washing or cleaning, consisting of a mixture of sodium or potassium salts of naturally occurring fatty acids. Like detergents, soaps work by surrounding particles of grease or dirt with their molecules, thereby allowing them to be carried away. Unlike detergents, soaps react with the minerals common in most water, forming an insoluble film that remains on fabrics. For this reason soap is not as efficient a cleaner as most detergents. The film is also what causes rings to form in bathtubs.
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(Simple Object Access Protocol) A message-based protocol based on XML for accessing services on the Web. Initiated by Microsoft, IBM and others, it employs XML syntax to send text commands across the Internet using HTTP. SOAP is similar in purpose to the DCOM and CORBA distributed object systems, but is lighter weight and less programming intensive. Because of its simple exchange mechanism, SOAP can also be used to implement a messaging system. SOAP is supported in COM, DCOM, Internet Explorer and Microsoft's Java implementation. See UDDI, .NET Framework and REST.
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(uncountable) A substance able to mix with both oil and water, used for cleaning, often in the form of a solid bar or in liquid form, derived from fats or made synthetically.

I tried washing my hands with soap, but the stain wouldn't go away.

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(countable, informal) A soap opera.
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To apply soap to in washing.

Be sure to soap yourself well before rinsing.

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(informal) To cover with soap as a prank.

Those kids soaped my windows!

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(informal) To be discreet about (a topic).
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(slang, dated) To flatter; to wheedle.
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Soap is something that is used with water to make suds and is used for cleaning.
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Some soaps are safer for our environment because they use natural ingredients and limit the amount of artificial chemicals typically found in soap.
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(slang) no soap
  • Not possible or permissible.
  • Unsuccessful; futile.
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(slang) no soap
  • the offer, idea, etc. is not acceptable
  • to no avail
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of soap

  • Middle English sope from Old English sāpe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sope, sape, from Old English sāpe (“soap, salve"), from Proto-Germanic *saipÇ­, from Proto-Indo-European *seyb-, *seyp- (“to pour out, drip, trickle, strain"). Cognate with Scots saip, sape (“soap"), West Frisian sjippe (“soap"), Dutch zeep (“soap"), Low German sepe (“soap"), German Seife (“soap"), Swedish sÃ¥pa (“soap"), Icelandic sápa (“soap"). Related also to Old English sāp (“amber, resin, pomade, unguent"), Latin sÄ“bum (“tallow, fat, grease"). See seep.

    From Wiktionary