Coaxial-cable meaning

A cable consisting of a conducting outer metal tube enclosing and insulated from a central conducting core, used primarily for the transmission of high-frequency signals.
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A cable consisting of an electrically conductive wire surrounded by a layer of insulating material, a layer of shielding material, and an outer layer of insulating material, usually plastic or rubber. The purpose of the shielding layer is to reduce external electrical interference. Coaxial cables are used for transmission of high-frequency audio, video, computer network and other signals.
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A strong, flexible, high-capacity cable widely used in audio, video and data applications. Commonly called "coax" (pronounced "co-axe"), the cable comprises a solid or stranded wire in the center, surrounded by insulation. The insulation is wrapped with a metallic foil or braided wire that serves as the ground line and interference shield. All of this is enclosed in a plastic cover, which may have a fire-safe Teflon coating.There Are Many TypesTypically with impedances of 50 or 75 Ohms, cables have different outside diameters and maximum capacities for operating voltage. Designated with an RG (radio grade) prefix such as RG-6, cables are also rated for signal loss (attenuation in dBs per 100 feet). Following are common types; however, there are many more in use. See RCA connector and F connector. Impedance Core Layers Range in Dia. inType Ohms (mm) Sheath RG-6 75-76 1.0 2 RG-6 Quad 75-76 1.0 4 RG-58 50-53.5 0.9 1 RG-59 73-75 0.81 1 RG-59 Quad 73-75 0.81 4
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A very robust shielded copper cable. All components are symmetrically arranged around a common axis, or center point, hence the term coaxial. A coax cable has a relatively thick center conductor (in comparison to a twisted-pair conductor), generally solid, although stranded wire sometimes is used in applications requiring greater flex strength.The metal used for the inner conductor may be bare copper, silvered copper, tinned copper, copper-clad aluminum or copper-covered steel. A layer of dielectric material, either foam or solid, generally surrounds the inner conductor, serving to separate it from the single outer conductor, or sometimes two outer conductors.The conductor(s) comprising the outer shield generally consists of a solid aluminum foil, although a braided or stranded metal screen of aluminum, bare copper, silvered copper, copper-clad aluminum, or tinned copper may be used. The entire cable is then protected by a sheath of dielectric material such as PVC or Teflon.
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A transmission line, consisting of a conducting wire surrounded by an insulated spacer, surrounded by a cylindrical conducting sheath; used to carry high frequency signals such as TV.
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