Cob meaning

kŏb
A male swan.
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A corncob.

Corn on the cob.

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A thickset, stocky, short-legged horse.
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A small lump or mass, as of coal.
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A mixture of clay and straw used as a building material.
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A corncob.
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A male swan.
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A short-legged, thickset riding horse.
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A male swan.
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(English Midlands) A round, often crusty roll or loaf of bread.
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Short for cobnut.
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(uncountable) A building material consisting of clay, sand, straw, water, and earth, similar to adobe; also called cobb, rammed earth or pisé.
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A horse having a stout body and short legs.
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(East Anglia) A gull, especially the black-backed gull (Larus marinus); also spelled cobb.
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Any of the gold and silver coins that were minted in the Spanish Empire and valued in reales or escudos, such as the piece of eight—especially those which were crudely struck and irregularly shaped.
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A Spanish coin formerly current in Ireland, worth about four shillings and sixpence.

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1583, Phillip Stubbes, The Second Part of the Anatomie of Abuses, N. Trübner & Co. (1882), page 27.

But I would not haue a few rich cobs to get into their clowches almoſt whole countries, ſo as the poore can haue no releefe by them.

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1827, anonymous angler quoted in William Hone, The Every-Day Book, volume II, part II, Hunt and Clarke, page 769.

For fishing and shuting, he was the cob of all this country!

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A fish, the miller's thumb.
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1599, Thomas Nashe, Lenten Stuffe, in The Harleian Miscellany, volume VI (1745), page 156.

…not a Scrap of him, but the Cobs of the two Herrings, the Fiſhermen had eaten, remained of him….

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1605, Thomas Dekker, The Honest Whore, in The Dramatic Works of Thomas Dekker, 2nd volume, John Pearson (1873), page 147.

…he can come bragging hither with foure white Herrings (at’s taile) in blue Coates without roes in their bellies, but I may ſtarue ere he giue me ſo much as a cob.

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The top or head of anything.

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A lump or piece of anything, usually of a somewhat large size, as of coal, or stone.
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A punishment consisting of blows inflicted on the buttocks with a strap or a flat piece of wood.

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To construct using mud blocks or to seal a wall using mud or an artificial equivalent.
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To beat with a flat instrument; to paddle.
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(Northern UK, possibly colloquial) To throw, chuck, lob.
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To chip off unwanted pieces of stone, so as to form a desired shape or improve the quality of mineral ore.
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Abbreviation of cobble.
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Alternative form of COB.
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Origin of cob

  • Probably from obsolete cob round object, head, testicle
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Uncertain. The word has many disparate senses, which are likely of diverse origin. The specifics of these origins have long been debated, as has the question of which senses arise from which origins. At least some senses likely originated as a variant of cop (“head”). In other senses, the word may be related to cub, itself of obscure origin but possibly from Old Norse kobbi (“seal”). However, many alternative etymologies have been proposed to account for some or all senses of cob; various sources have related it, for example, to English cot (“cottage”), Welsh cob (“top, tuft”), or German Kübel (“large container”). All these etymologies are disputed, and the exact origins of cob cannot be known with any certainty.
    From Wiktionary
  • Uncertain. Possibly onomatopoeic, but it has also been suggested that the word could be a continuation of Middle English cobbe (“fight”), a borrowing of Welsh cob (“blow”), or a cognate of Icelandic kubba (“chop”).
    From Wiktionary