Floss meaning

flôs, flŏs
Dental floss.
noun
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Soft, loosely twisted thread, as of silk or cotton, used in embroidery.
noun
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A downy or silky fibrous substance, such as corn silk or silk cotton.
noun
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To clean between (teeth) with dental floss.
verb
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To use dental floss.
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The rough silk covering a silkworm's cocoon.
noun
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The short, downy waste fibers of silk.
noun
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A soft, loosely twisted thread or yarn, as of silk (floss silk) or cotton, used in embroidery.
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A soft, silky substance resembling floss, as in milkweed pods.
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To clean (the teeth) with dental floss.
verb
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Dental floss.
noun
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To clean between teeth with dental floss.
verb
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(Free, Libre and Open Source Software) See free software and open source.
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A thread, used to clean the area between the teeth.
noun
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(raw) Silk fibres.
noun
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The fibres covering a corn cob.
noun
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Any thread-like material having parallel strands that are not spun or wound around each other.

Embroidery floss.

noun
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(UK) Spun sugar or cotton candy, especially in the phrase "candy floss".
noun
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To clean the area between the teeth using floss.
verb
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(African American Vernacular) To show off, especially by exhibiting one’s wealth or talent.
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(UK) A small stream of water.
noun
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Fluid glass floating on iron in the puddling furnace, produced by the vitrification of oxides and earths which are present.
noun
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Short or waste silk fibers, especially from the outer surface of the cocoon of a silkworm.
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Origin of floss

  • Perhaps alteration of French floche tuft of wool from Old French floc, floche from Latin floccus

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • 1750, from French floche (“tuft of wool”), from floc, from Old French flosche (“down, velvet”), from Latin floccus (“piece of wool”), probably from Frankish *flokko (“down, wool, flock”), from Proto-Germanic *flukkōn-, *flukkan-, *fluksōn- (“down, flock”), from Proto-Indo-European *plAwək- (“hair, fibres, tuft”). Cognate with Old High German flocko (“down”), Middle Dutch vlocke (“flock”), Norwegian dialectal flugsa (“snowflake”), Dutch flos (17c., “plush”). Related to fleece.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare German Floss a float.

    From Wiktionary