Wile meaning

wīl
Wile is defined as to trick or to spend time leisurely.

An example of wile is to cause someone to fall into a trap.

An example of wile is to lay in the backyard all day sipping lemonade.

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The definition of a wile is a trick or seducing behavior.

An example of a wile is a joke or trick to deceive someone.

noun
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A stratagem or trick intended to deceive or ensnare.
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A disarming or seductive manner, device, or procedure.

The wiles of a skilled negotiator.

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To influence or lead by means of wiles; entice.
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To pass (time) agreeably.

Wile away a Sunday afternoon.

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A sly trick; deceitful artifice; stratagem.
noun
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A beguiling or coquettish trick.
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(now rare) Craftiness; guile.
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To beguile; lure.
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(usually in the plural) A trick or stratagem practiced for ensnaring or deception; a sly, insidious artifice.

He was seduced by her wiles.

noun
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Alternative spelling of while, "to pass the time".

Here's a pleasant way to wile away the hours.

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pronoun
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(rare) A male given name transferred from the surname.
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wile away
  • to while away (time, etc.)
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of wile

  • Middle English wil from Old North French from Old Norse vēl trick or of Low German origin V., sense 2, influenced by while

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English wile, wyle, from Old English wÄ«l (“wile, trick") and wiÄ¡le (“divination"), from Proto-Germanic *wÄ«lÄ… (“craft, deceit") (from Proto-Indo-European *wei- (“to turn, bend")) and Proto-Germanic *wigulÄ…, *wihulÄ… (“prophecy") (from Proto-Indo-European *weik- (“to consecrate, hallow, make holy")). Cognate with Icelandic vél, væl (“artifice, craft, device, fraud, trick").

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English wile, an occupational surname for a trapper or a nickname for a wily person.

    From Wiktionary