Bush definition

bo͝osh
To extend in a bushy growth.
verb
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A low shrub with many branches.
noun
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(person) 1924-2018; 41st president of the U.S. (1989-93)
proper name
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(slang) Bush-league; second-rate.
adjective
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To furnish or line with a bushing.
verb
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(person) 1946- ; 43d president of the U.S. (2001-09): son of George.
proper name
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A thick growth of shrubs; a thicket.
noun
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To grow or branch out like a bush.
verb
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To decorate, protect, or support with bushes.
verb
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The definition of a bush is a woody shrub or group of shrubs.

The shrubs planted in landscaping often near a fence or front door are an example of a bush.

noun
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A fox's tail.
noun
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Land covered with dense vegetation or undergrowth.
noun
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Land remote from settlement.

The Australian bush.

noun
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A shaggy mass, as of hair.
noun
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(vulgar slang) A growth of pubic hair.
noun
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(archaic) A clump of ivy hung outside a tavern to indicate the availability of wine inside.
noun
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(obsolete) A tavern.
noun
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(person) 1890-1974; U.S. electrical engineer & administrator.
proper name
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(horticulture) A woody plant distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, being usually less than six metres tall; a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category.
noun
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(slang) A person's pubic hair, especially a woman's; loosely, a woman's vulva.
noun
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A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a tree.

Bushes to support pea vines.

noun
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A shrub or branch, properly, a branch of ivy (sacred to Bacchus), hung out at vintners' doors, or as a tavern sign; hence, a tavern sign, and symbolically, the tavern itself.
noun
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(hunting) The tail, or brush, of a fox.
noun
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(intransitive) To branch thickly in the manner of a bush.
verb
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To set bushes for; to support with bushes.

To bush peas.

verb
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To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush.

To bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground.

verb
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(archaic) A tavern or wine merchant.
noun
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(often with "the") Rural areas, typically remote, wooded, undeveloped and uncultivated.
  • (Australia) The countryside area of Australia that is less arid and less remote than the outback; loosely, areas of natural flora even within conurbations.
  • (New Zealand) An area of New Zealand covered in forest, especially native forest.
  • (Canada) The wild forested areas of Canada; upcountry.
noun
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(Canada) A woodlot or bluff on a farm.
noun
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The noun "bush", used attributively.

The bush vote; bush party; bush tucker; bush aristocracy; bush tea.

adjective
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(Australia) Towards the direction of the outback.

On hatching, the chicks scramble to the surface and head bush on their own.

adverb
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(colloquial) Not skilled; not professional; not major league.

They're supposed to be a major league team, but so far they've been bush.

adjective
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(baseball) Amateurish behavior, short for "bush league behavior"

The way that pitcher showed up the batter after the strikeout was bush.

noun
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A thick washer or hollow cylinder of metal (also bushing).
noun
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A mechanical attachment, usually a metallic socket with a screw thread, such as the mechanism by which a camera is attached to a tripod stand.
noun
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A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.

noun
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To furnish with a bush or lining.

To bush a pivot hole.

verb
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A surname​.
pronoun
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of bush - -bouche

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
bush
Plural:
bushes

Adjective

Base Form:
bush
Superlative:
bushiest

Origin of bush

  • Middle English partly from Old English busc partly from Old French bois wood (of Germanic origin) and partly of Scandinavian origin (akin to Danish busk) N., sense 3, possibly from Dutch bosch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From bush bushing possibly alteration of Dutch bus box

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English busch, busshe, from Old English busc, bysc (“copse, grove, scrub”, in placenames), from Proto-Germanic *buskaz (“bush, thicket”), probably from Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (“to grow”). Cognate with West Frisian bosk (“woods”), Dutch bos (“woods”), German Busch (“bush”), Danish busk (“bush, shrub”), Swedish buske (“bush, shrub”), Persian بیشه (“woods”). Latin and Romance forms (Latin boscus, Occitan bòsc, French bois and buisson, Italian bosco and boscaglia, Spanish bosque, Portuguese bosque) derive from the Germanic. The sense 'pubic hair' was first attested in 1745.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle Dutch bosch (modern bos) ("wood, forest"), first appearing in the Dutch colonies to designate an uncleared district of a colony, and thence adopted in British colonies as bush.

    From Wiktionary

  • Either the family name for those who live near a bush or a thicket of bushes, or the family name for those living at or near a bush (in the archaic sense of wine merchant or tavern).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle Dutch busse 'box; wheel bushing', from Proto-Germanic *buhsiz (compare English box). More at box.

    From Wiktionary

  • From the sign of a bush usually employed to indicate such places.

    From Wiktionary

  • Back-formation from bush league.

    From Wiktionary