Muse meaning

myo͝oz
noun
25
5
A person, esp. a woman, who is the object of love or devotion and is regarded as a source of inspiration.
noun
23
5
To think deeply and at length; meditate.
verb
22
2
The definition of a muse is a spirit or source that inspires an artist.

An example of muse is someone having a thought about the origin of life.

An example of muse is the character Kira from the movie Xanadu.

noun
17
1
A state of reflection.
noun
13
2
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(greek mythology) Any of the nine daughters of Mnemosyne and Zeus, each of whom presided over a different art or science.
noun
10
1
(intransitive) To become lost in thought, to ponder.
verb
9
2
A musing; deep meditation.
noun
6
1
To think or say meditatively.
verb
6
3
To consider or say thoughtfully.

Mused that it might take longer to drive than walk.

verb
5
3
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A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.

Find a hare without a muse. (old proverb)

noun
4
1
To be absorbed in one's thoughts; engage in thought.
verb
3
1
One of the nine Ancient Greek deities of the arts.
noun
3
3
Any of the Muses.
noun
2
1
(1) (MultiUser Simulation Environment, MultiUser Shared Environment) See MUD.
2
1
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(archaic) A poet; a bard.

noun
2
1
To think on; to meditate on.
verb
2
1
To wonder at.

verb
2
1
An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
noun
2
1
Muse is defined as to have deep thoughts or to meditate.

An example of muse is someone thinking about what their life may look like in the future.

verb
2
2
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To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
verb
2
2
(archaic) A poet.
noun
0
0

Origin of muse

  • Middle English musen from Old French muser (possibly from mus snout) (from Medieval Latin mūsum) or of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin Mūsa from Greek Mousa men-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French muse, from Latin MÅ«sa, from Ancient Greek Μοῦσα (Mousa).

    From Wiktionary

  • First attested in 1340. From Old French muser.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French musse. See muset.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin Musa.

    From Wiktionary