Bard meaning

bärd
Frequency:
A poet, especially a lyric poet.
noun
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The definition of a bard is an ancient person who composes and signs poems about heroes and epic events.

A minstrel is an example of a bard.

noun
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One of an ancient Celtic order of minstrel poets who composed and recited verses celebrating the legendary exploits of chieftains and heroes.
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To put bards on (a horse)
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To cover (meat) in thin pieces of bacon or fat to preserve moisture during cooking.
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An ancient Celtic poet and singer of epic poems, who accompanied himself on the harp.
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Any of various other national minstrels or epic poets.
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A poet.
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A piece of armor for a horse.
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A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
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(by extension) A poet.

The bard of Avon.

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A piece of defensive (or, sometimes, ornamental) armor for a horse's neck, breast, and flanks; a barb. (Often in the plural.)
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Defensive armor formerly worn by a man at arms.
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(cooking) A thin slice of fat bacon used to cover any meat or game.
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The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
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Specifically, Peruvian bark.
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To cover a horse in defensive armor.
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(cooking) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.
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A piece of armor used to protect or ornament a horse.
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To equip (a horse) with bards.
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the Bard
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

the Bard

Origin of bard

  • Middle English barde from Old French from Old Italian barda from Arabic barda‘a packsaddle from Persian pardah purdah

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Irish and Scottish Gaelic bard and from Welsh bardd gwerə-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowed in the 15th century from Scottish Gaelic bard, Irish bard, and Welsh bardd.

    From Wiktionary

  • From French barde. English since the late 15th century.

    From Wiktionary