Druid meaning

dro͝oĭd
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A member of a literate and influential class in Celtic society that included priests, soothsayers, judges, poets, etc. in ancient Britain, Ireland, and France.
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Alternative form of druid.
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A member of an order of priests in ancient Gaul and Britain who appear in Welsh and Irish legend as prophets and sorcerers.
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One of an order of priests among certain groups of Celts before the adoption of Abrahamic religions.
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A follower of Druidry.

You can find hundreds of Druids in Stonehenge.

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Origin of druid

  • From Latin druidēs druids of Celtic origin deru- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French druide, from Old French, via Latin, from Gaulish. The earliest record of the term is reported in Greek as Δρυΐδαι (druidai) (plural), cited in Diogenes Laertius in the 3rd century CE. The native Celtic word for "druid" is first attested in Latin texts as druides (plural) and other texts also employ the form druidae (akin to the Greek form). It is understood that the Latin form is a borrowing from Gaulish. The word is cognate with the later insular Celtic words, Old Irish druí (“druid, sorcerer”) and early Welsh dryw (“seer”). The proto-Celtic word may be *dru-wid-s (literally, "oak-knower"), from Proto-Indo-European *dóru (“tree”) and *weyd- (“to see”).

    From Wiktionary