Lodge meaning

lŏj
The definition of a lodge is a shelter such as a cottage or resort, generally used for vacation purposes.

An example of lodge is where skiers may stay on a skiing trip.

noun
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Lodge is defined as to provide or rent a cottage or resort space, to be stuck or caught, or to store something.

An example of lodge is to stay at a hotel for five nights.

An example of lodge is for a splinter to be stuck in someone's finger.

An example of lodge is put money in a safe.

verb
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The den of certain animals, such as the dome-shaped structure built by beavers.
noun
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To serve as a depository for; contain.

This cellar lodges our oldest wines.

verb
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To place, leave, or deposit, as for safety.

Documents lodged with a trusted associate.

verb
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To fix, force, or implant.

Lodge a bullet in a wall.

verb
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To register (a charge or complaint, for example) before an authority, such as a court; file.
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To vest (authority, for example).
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To beat (crops) down flat.

Rye lodged by the cyclone.

verb
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To be or become embedded.

The ball lodged in the fence.

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The den or typical lair of certain wild animals, esp. beavers.
noun
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To provide with a place of temporary residence; house.
verb
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To rent rooms to; take as a paying guest.
verb
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To serve as a temporary dwelling for.
verb
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To serve as a container for.
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To place or deposit for safekeeping.
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To put or send into a place or position by shooting, thrusting, etc.; place; land.

To lodge an arrow in a target.

verb
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To bring (an accusation, complaint, etc.) before legal authorities.
verb
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To confer (powers) upon.
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To beat down (growing crops), as rain.
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To live in a certain place for a time.
verb
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To live (with another or in another's home) as a paying guest.
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To come to rest or be placed and remain firmly fixed.

A chicken bone lodged in the cat's throat.

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1850-1924; U.S. senator (1893-1924)
proper name
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A building for recreational use such as a hunting lodge or a summer cabin.
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Porter's or caretaker's rooms at or near the main entrance to a building or an estate.
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A local chapter of some fraternities, such as freemasons.
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(US) A local chapter of a trade union.
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A rural hotel or resort, an inn.
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A beaver's shelter constructed on a pond or lake.
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A den or cave.
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The chamber of an abbot, prior, or head of a college.
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(mining) The space at the mouth of a level next to the shaft, widened to permit wagons to pass, or ore to be deposited for hoisting; called also platt.

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A collection of objects lodged together.
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A family of Native Americans, or the persons who usually occupy an Indian lodge; as a unit of enumeration, reckoned from four to six persons.

The tribe consists of about two hundred lodges, that is, of about a thousand individuals.

noun
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(intransitive) To be firmly fixed in a specified position.

I've got some spinach lodged between my teeth.

The bullet missed its target and lodged in the bark of a tree.

verb
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(intransitive) To stay in a boarding-house, paying rent to the resident landlord or landlady.

The detective Sherlock Holmes lodged in Baker Street.

verb
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(intransitive) To stay in any place or shelter.
verb
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To supply with a room or place to sleep in for a time.
verb
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To put money, jewellery, or other valuables for safety.
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To place (a statement, etc.) with the proper authorities (such as courts, etc.).
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(intransitive) To become flattened, as grass or grain, when overgrown or beaten down by the wind.

The heavy rain caused the wheat to lodge.

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Origin of lodge

  • Middle English from Old French loge of Germanic origin
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English logge, from Old French loge (“arbor, covered walk-way"), Medieval Latin lobia, laubia, from Frankish *laubija (“shelter"), from Proto-Germanic *laubijō (“arbour, protective roof, shelter made of foliage"), from Proto-Germanic *laubÄ… (“leaf"), from Proto-Indo-European *lōubh- (“the outer parts of a tree, bark, foliage"). Cognate with Old High German louba (“porch, gallery") (German Laube (“bower, arbor")), Old High German loub (“leaf, foliage"), Old English lÄ“af (“leaf, foliage"). Related to lobby, loggia, leaf.
    From Wiktionary