Abide definition

ə-bīd
To dwell or reside.
verb
32
1
To wait patiently for.
verb
43
15
To remain in a place.
verb
27
2
(archaic) To stay; reside (in or at)
verb
26
3
To submit to; put up with.
verb
20
4
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To stand fast; remain; go on being.
verb
14
1
To continue in existence; endure.
verb
13
3
To await.
verb
9
0
To accept or submit to.
verb
4
0
To dwell, remain, reside, or stay.
verb
4
0
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To put up with; tolerate.

Can't abide such incompetence.

verb
4
1
Abide means to stay with or remain.

To remain married for life is an example of abide.

verb
3
1
(intransitive) To stay; to continue in a place; to remain stable or fixed in some state or condition; to be left. [First attested from around (1150 to 1350).]
verb
2
0
To tolerate or withstand.
verb
1
0
To await submissively; accept without question; submit to. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
verb
1
0
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To await.
verb
0
0
(intransitive, archaic) To have one's abode; to dwell; to reside; to sojourn. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
verb
0
0
(intransitive) To endure. to remain; to last. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
verb
0
0
To stand ready for; to await for someone; watch for. [First attested prior to around 1150.]
verb
0
0
To endure without yielding; to withstand; await defiantly; to encounter; to persevere. [First attested from around (1150 to 1350).]

The old oak tree abides the wind endlessly.

verb
0
0
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To bear patiently; to tolerate; to put up with; stand. [First attested in the late 15th century.]
verb
0
0
To pay for; to stand the consequences of; to answer for; to suffer for; to atone for. [First attested in the late 16th century.]
verb
0
0
The definition of abide is to put up with something.

An example of abide is not complaining about your child’s loud music.

verb
0
1
To adhere, execute, obey, perform, or otherwise act in conformity with.
verb
0
1
abide by
  • To conform to; comply with:
    Abide by the rules.
idiom
1
0
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abide by
  • to live up to (a promise, agreement, etc.)
  • to submit to and carry out (a rule, decision, etc.)
idiom
1
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of abide

  • Middle English abiden from Old English ābīdan ā- intensive pref. bīdan to remain bheidh- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English abiden, from Old English ābīdan (“to abide, wait, remain, delay, remain behind; survive; wait for, await; expect”), from Proto-Germanic *uzbīdaną (“to expect, tolerate”), equivalent to a- +‎ bide. Cognate with Scots abyde (“to abide, remain”), Middle High German erbīten (“to await, expect”), Gothic (usbeidan, “to expect, await, have patience”). The sense of pay for is due to influence from aby.

    From Wiktionary