Leaf meaning

lēf
The definition of a leaf is a part of a plant or tree attached to the stem or branches.
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A usually green, flattened, lateral structure attached to a stem and functioning as a principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in most plants.
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A leaflike organ or structure.
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Complexity - Simple leaves are those which the leaves go outward, and they are all in a unified shape. compound leaves, you will notice that they appear to be like multiple leaves that have been combined together.
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Stem - Leaves with stems on them are known as petiolated. If a leaf does not have a stem on it, then are known as sessiles.
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Shape - Ovate leaves are shaped like eggs, and they have sharp, pointed ends. Cordate leaves are shaped like hearts. Lanceolate leaves tend to look like lances. Elliptic leaves are thin and egg-shaped. Hastate leaves are comprised of three connected leaves which stretch out from one main point. Acicular leaves are long, needle-like, and have pointed tips. Linear leaves are like acicular leaves, except they have rounded ends.
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Edge - Lobed leaves have lobes on them that point out at random intervals. Dentate leaves, which come from the Latin word for "teeth," have little teeth-like markings along the edges of the leaf. Serrate leaves are similar to dentate leaves, except the little teeth are much closer together. Sinuate leaves have curved edges with waves or bumps along the sides. Leaves with smooth edges are known as "entire edges."
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The leaf's color comes from the three natural pigments that are present in the plant’s cells structures - chlorophyll (green color), carotenoid (orange, yellow and brown colors) and anthocyanin (red, purple and crimson color).
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During the fall, less chlorophyll is produced since the days are shorter and cooler. The rate of chlorophyll production decreases, fading the green color and the leaves produce vibrant anthocyanin pigments.
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Red and yellow pigments will soon start to disintegrate and decompose once the leaf falls to the ground.
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An example of a leaf is the part of the tree that is green in the summer and may change colors and fall off of the tree before the start of winter.

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The usually green and flat organ that represents the most prominent feature of most vegetative plants.
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Anything resembling the leaf of a plant.
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A sheet of any substance beaten or rolled until very thin.

Gold leaf.

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A sheet of a book, magazine, etc (consisting of two pages, one on each face of the leaf).
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(in the plural) Tea leaves.
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A flat section used to extend the size of a table.
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A moveable panel, e.g. of a bridge or door, originally one that hinged but now also applied to other forms of movement.

The train car has one single-leaf and two double-leaf doors per side.

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(botany) A foliage leaf or any of the many and often considerably different structures it can specialise into.
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(computing, mathematics) In a tree, a node that has no descendants.
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The layer of fat supporting the kidneys of a pig, leaf fat.
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One of the teeth of a pinion, especially when small.
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(intransitive) To produce leaves; put forth foliage.
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The leaves of a plant used or processed for a specific purpose.

Large supplies of tobacco leaf.

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Any of the sheets of paper bound in a book, each side of which constitutes a page.
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One of several metal strips forming a leaf spring.
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To produce leaves; put forth foliage.

Trees just beginning to leaf.

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To turn pages, as in searching or browsing.

Leafed through the catalog.

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To turn through the pages of.
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Any of the flat, thin, expanded organs, usually green, growing laterally from the stem or twig of a plant: it usually consists of a broad blade, a petiole, or stalk, and stipules and is involved in the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration.
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In popular usage,
  • The blade of a leaf.
  • A petal.
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Leaves collectively.

Choice tobacco leaf.

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A design resembling a leaf, used as an ornament in architecture.
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A sheet of paper, esp. as part of a book, with a page on each side.
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A flat, hinged or movable part of a folding door, shutter, etc.
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One of a number of metal strips laid one upon another to make a leaf spring.
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To put forth or bear leaves.
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To turn the pages of a book, etc., esp. so as to glance quickly (through)
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Turn the pages of.
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An appendage growing from the stem of a plant. Leaves are extremely variable in form and function according to species. For example, the needles of pine trees, the spines of cacti, and the bright red parts of the poinsettia plant are all leaves modified for different purposes. However, most leaves are flat and green and adapted to capturing sunlight and carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. They consist of an outer tissue layer (the epidermis) through which water and gases are exchanged, a spongy inner layer of cells that contain chloroplasts, and veins that supply water and minerals and carry out food. Some leaves are simple, while others are compound, consisting of multiple leaflets. The flat part of the leaf, the blade, is often attached to the stem by a leafstalk.
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In database management, the last node of a tree.
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take a leaf from (someone)
  • To use (someone) as an example.
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take a leaf from
  • To use (someone) as an example.
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in leaf
  • having leaves grown; with foliage
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turn over a new leaf
  • to make a new start
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

take a leaf from (someone)
take a leaf from
in leaf

Origin of leaf

  • Middle English from Old English lēaf

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English leef, from Old English lēaf, from Proto-Germanic *laubą (compare West Frisian leaf, Low German Loov, Dutch loof, German Laub, Danish løv), from Proto-Indo-European *leup- 'to peel, break off' (compare Irish luibh 'herb', Latin liber 'bast; book', Lithuanian lúoba 'bark', Albanian labë 'rind').

    From Wiktionary