Spire meaning

spīr
A top part or structure that tapers upward, such as a rock formation or steeple.
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A slender, tapering plant part.
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To furnish with a spire.
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To rise and taper steeply.
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(zool.) The upper part of a spiral shell of a gastropod.
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The area farthest from the aperture and nearest the apex on a coiled gastropod shell.
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A spiral or coil.
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Any of the convolutions of a spiral or coil.
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A sprout, spike, or stalk of a plant, a blade of grass, etc.
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The top part of a pointed, tapering object or structure, as a mountain peak.
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Anything that tapers to a point, as a pointed structure capping a tower or steeple.
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To extend upward, tapering to a point; shoot up or rise in, or put forth, a spire or spires.
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(now rare) The stalk or stem of a plant. [from 10th c.]
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A young shoot of a plant; a spear. [from 14th c.]
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A sharp or tapering point. [from 16th c.]
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A tapering structure built on a roof or tower, especially as one of the central architectural features of a church or cathedral roof. [from 16th c.]

The spire of the church rose high above the town.

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The top, or uppermost point, of anything; the summit. [from 17th c.]
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(mining) A tube or fuse for communicating fire to the charge in blasting.
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Of a seed, plant etc.: to sprout, to send forth the early shoots of growth; to germinate. [from 14th c.]
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To grow upwards rather than develop horizontally. [from 14th c.]
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(intransitive, obsolete) To breathe. [14th-16th c.]

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One of the sinuous foldings of a serpent or other reptile; a coil. [from 16th c.]
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A spiral. [from 17th c.]

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(geometry) The part of a spiral generated in one revolution of the straight line about the pole.
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Origin of spire

  • Latin spīra coil from Greek speira

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English spīr

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old English spÄ«r. Cognate with Dutch spier, German Spier, Spiere, Swedish spira.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French spirer, and its source, Latin spÄ«rāre (“to breathe").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle French spire.

    From Wiktionary