Nap Definition

năp
napped, napping, naps
noun
naps
A brief, light sleep; doze.
Webster's New World
The downy or hairy surface of cloth formed by short hairs or fibers, esp. when artificially raised by brushing, etc.; pile.
Webster's New World
Any such downy surface, as that raised on the flesh side of leather.
Webster's New World
The highest bid in this game, announcing the intention to win five tricks, the maximum number in a hand.
American Heritage
Webster's New World
Synonyms:
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verb
napped, napping, naps
To doze or sleep lightly for a short time.
Webster's New World
To raise a nap on (fabric or leather), as by brushing.
Webster's New World
To be unaware of imminent danger or trouble; be off guard.
The civil unrest caught the police napping.
American Heritage
To be careless or unprepared.
Webster's New World
To pour or put a sauce or gravy over (a cooked dish).
American Heritage
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To seize and carry away; steal.
Dognap, petnap.
Webster's New World
other

An official Tier 1 site at which an Internet service provider (ISP) can access the Internet backbone and exchange traffic with other ISPs. Some NAPs are known as Internet Exchanges (IXs) and some as MAEs. NAP locations include San Francisco, California; Chicago, Illinois; Miami, Florida; and New Jersey. See also Internet, ISP, IX, and MAE.

Webster's New World Telecom

Other Word Forms of Nap

Noun

Singular:
nap
Plural:
naps

Origin of Nap

  • From Middle English nappen, from Old English hnappian (“to doze, slumber, sleep"), from Proto-Germanic *hnappōnÄ… (“to nap"). Cognate with Old High German hnaffezan, hnaffezzan (> Middle High German nafzen (“to slumber") > German dialectal napfezen, nafzen (“to nod, slumber, nap")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Alteration (perhaps influenced by obsolete French nape tablecloth) of Middle English noppe from Middle Dutch

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from nappen to doze from Old English hnappian

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • possibly Scandanavian, cognate with nab, see Swedish nappa (“pinch")

    From Wiktionary

  • French napper from nappe cover nappe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the name of the French emperor Napoleon I of France (Bonaparte)

    From Wiktionary

  • From French napper, from nappe (“nape").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English nappe, from Middle Dutch

    From Wiktionary

  • Short for napoleon

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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