Wale definition

wāl
A band or ridge woven around the body of a basket to brace it.
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One of the parallel ribs or ridges in the surface of a fabric such as corduroy.
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The texture or weave of such a fabric.

A wide wale.

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A gunwale.
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One of the heavy planks or strakes extending along the sides of a wooden ship.
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To raise marks on (the skin), as by whipping.
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A raised line or streak made on the skin by the slash of a stick or whip; welt; weal.
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(naut.) Any of several heavy planks fastened in a horizontal row along the outside of the hull of a wooden ship.
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A ridge on the surface of cloth, as corduroy.
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Texture of cloth.
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To mark (the skin) with wales.
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To make (cloth) or weave (wickerwork) with wales.
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Choice; selection.
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That chosen as best.
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To choose; pick out; select.
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A ridge or low barrier.
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A raised rib in knit goods or fabric, especially corduroy. (As opposed to course)
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The texture of a piece of fabric.
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(nautical) A horizontal ridge or ledge on the outside planking of a wooden ship. (See gunwale, chainwale)
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A horizontal timber used for supporting or retaining earth.
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A timber bolted to a row of piles to secure them together and in position.

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A ridge on the outside of a horse collar.
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A ridge or streak produced on skin by a cane or whip.

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To strike the skin in such a way as to produce a wale.
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To give a surface a texture of wales.
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Something selected as being the best, preference; choice.
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verb
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A mark raised on the skin, as by a whip; a weal or welt.
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Alternative Forms

Alternative Form of wale - weale

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
wale
Plural:
Wales

Origin of wale

  • Middle English from Old English variant of walu wel-2 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English wal, wale, from Old Norse val (“choice”), from Proto-Germanic *walą, *walō (“desire, choice”), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)welə- (“to choose, wish”). Akin to Old Norse velja (“to choose”), Old High German wala "choice" (German wählen "to choose"), Old English willan (“to want”). More at will.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English wale, from Old English walu (“ridge, bank; rib, comb (of helmet); metal ridge on top of helmet; weal, mark of a blow”), from Proto-Germanic *waluz (“stick, root”), from Proto-Indo-European *welʷ- (“to turn, wind, roll”). Akin to Low German wāle; Old Norse vala (“knuckle”).

    From Wiktionary