Wheat meaning

wēt, hwēt
Any of various annual cereal grasses of the genus Triticum of the Mediterranean region and southwest Asia, especially T. aestivum, widely cultivated in temperate regions in many varieties for its commercially important edible grain.
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The grain of any of these grasses, ground to produce flour used in breads, pasta, and other foods.
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Any of several cereal grasses (genus Triticum) having dense, erect spikes containing grains which thresh free of the chaff; esp., bread wheat (T. aestivum), a cultigen with large, nutritious grains.
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The grain of any of these grasses, esp. bread wheat (used in making flour, breakfast cereals, pastries, cakes, etc.) and durum (used in making macaroni, noodles, etc.): next to rice, the most widely used grain.
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Whole-wheat bread.
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An agricultural commodity that is produced throughout the United States, as well as Canada and Australia. Wheat is used in a variety of products such as bread, baked goods, pastas, and cereals. Futures and options on wheat have been traded since 1877 on the Chicago Board of Trade. Futures and options contracts also are traded on many other futures exchanges throughout the world. Traders watch the monthly wheat crop reports produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture because they give information about expected supply, which will directly affect prices.
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(countable) Any of several cereal grains, of the genus Triticum, that yields flour as used in bakery.
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(uncountable) A light brown colour, like that of wheat.

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Wheaten, of a light brown colour, like that of wheat.
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Origin of wheat

  • Middle English whete from Old English hwǣte kweit- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English whete, from Old English hwÇ£te, from Proto-Germanic *hwaitijaz (compare West Frisian weet, Dutch weit, Low German Weten, German Weizen, Danish hvede, Swedish vete, Icelandic hveiti), from *hwÄ«taz 'white'. More at white. For semantic development, compare Welsh gwenith 'wheat', from gwenn 'white'.
    From Wiktionary