Hare meaning

hâr
To move hurriedly, as if hunting a swift quarry.
verb
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Any of a large group of swift mammals (order Lagomorpha) of the same family (Leporidae) as the rabbits, with long ears, soft fur, a cleft upper lip, a short tail, and long, powerful hind legs: it differs from a rabbit in that it is larger, does not burrow, and has furry, active young.
noun
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(brit., informal) To run fast or go hurriedly.
verb
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Any of various mammals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to rabbits but having longer ears and legs and giving birth to active, furred young.
noun
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The definition of a hare is an animal with long, powerful hind legs that is similar to a rabbit but is bigger and has longer ears and legs.

A rabbit-like animal that competed in a race with a tortoise in a famous children's story is an example of a hare.

A fake animal used in greyhound races to get the dogs to run around the track is an example of a hare.

noun
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Any of several plant-eating animals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to a rabbit, but larger and with longer ears.
noun
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(intransitive) To move swiftly.
verb
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(obsolete) To excite; to tease, or worry; to harry.

verb
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Origin of hare

  • Middle English from Old English hara kas- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English hare, from Old English hara (“hare”), from Proto-Germanic *hasô (compare West Frisian hazze, Dutch haas, German Hase, Swedish hare, Icelandic heri), from *Proto-Germanic *haswaz (“grey”) (compare Old English hasu, Middle High German heswe (“pale, dull”)), from Proto-Indo-European *kas- (compare Welsh cannu (“to whiten”), ceinach (“hare”), Latin cānus (“white”), cascus (“old”), Old Prussian sasins (“hare”), Pashto [script?] (soe, “hare”)[Arabic?], Sanskrit शश (śaśa, “hare”)).

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare harry, harass.

    From Wiktionary