Bunny meaning

bŭnē
Frequency:
(slang) A sexually attractive young woman.

Ski bunny, beach bunny.

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A rabbit, especially a young one.
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A rabbit.
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The definition of a bunny is a rabbit, particularly a small or young rabbit.

An example of a bunny is the character Thumper from Disney's Bambi.

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(UK dialectal) A culvert or short covered drain connecting two ditches.
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(UK dialectal) A chine or gully formed by water running over the edge of a cliff; a wooded glen or small ravine opening through the cliff line to the sea.
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(UK dialectal) Any small drain or culvert.
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(UK dialectal) A brick arch or wooden bridge, covered with earth across a drawn or carriage in a water-meadow, just wide enough to allow a hay-wagon to pass over.
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(UK dialectal) A small pool of water.
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(UK dialectal) A swelling from a blow; a bump.
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(mining) A sudden enlargement or mass of ore, as opposed to a vein or lode.
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A rabbit, especially a juvenile.
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A bunny girl: a nightclub waitress who wears a costume having rabbit ears and tail.
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(sports) In basketball, an easy shot (i.e., one right next to the bucket) that is missed.
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(South Africa) Bunny chow; a snack of bread filled with curry.
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(not comparable) In skiing, easy or unchallenging.

Let’s start on the bunny hill.

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Resembling a bun.
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A person of a specific type.

A dumb bunny.

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(sports) A shot that is uncontested or should be easily made, as in basketball.
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Origin of bunny

  • From dialectal bun rabbit (perhaps from Scots tail of a hare buns) –y

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English bune (“hollow stalk or stem, drinking straw”), from Old English bune (“cup, beaker, drinking vessel; reed, cane”), of unknown origin. Related to English bun, boon (“the stalk of flax or hemp less the fibre”), Scots bune, boon, been, see bun, boon. Compare also bunweed.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English bony, boni (“swelling, tumor”), from Old French bugne, buigne (“swelling, lump”), from Old Frankish *bungjo (“swelling, bump”), from Proto-Germanic *bungô, *bunkô (“lump, clump, heap, crowd”). More at bunion, bunch.

    From Wiktionary

  • From bun (“small breadroll”) +‎ -y.

    From Wiktionary

  • From bun (“rabbit”) +‎ -y.

    From Wiktionary