Hardy-weinberg-law definitions

här'dē-wīn'bûrg
A fundamental principle in population genetics stating that the genotype frequencies and gene frequencies of a large, randomly mating population remain constant provided immigration, mutation, and selection do not take place.
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A fundamental principle in population genetics stating that the genotype frequencies and gene frequencies of a large, randomly mating population remain constant provided immigration, mutation, and selection do not take place.
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A fundamental principle in population genetics stating that the genotype frequencies and gene frequencies of a large, randomly mating population remain constant provided immigration, mutation, and selection do not take place. In the simple case of a chromosome locus with two alleles, A and a, with frequencies p and q respectively, the frequency of the homozygotic genotype AA under random mating will be p2 , of heterozygotic Aa will be 2 pq, and of homozygotic aa will be q2 . The law is named for its formulators, British mathematician Godfrey Harold Hardy (1877–1947) and German physician Wilhelm Weinberg (1862–1937).
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Origin of hardy-weinberg-law

After Godfrey Harold Hardy (1877–1947), British mathematician, and Wilhelm Weinberg (1862–1937), German physician