Stifle meaning

stīfəl
To stifle is to stop someone from breathing or suppress actions by yourself or others.

When you tell someone that all of his ideas are stupid, this is an example of a situation where you stifle his creativity.

verb
3
2
To keep in or hold back; repress.

Stifled my indignation.

verb
1
1
The joint of the hind leg analogous to the human knee in certain quadrupeds, such as the horse.
noun
1
1
To repress, keep in or hold back.

The army stifled the rebellion.

verb
1
1
To kill by cutting off the supply of air from; suffocate; smother; choke.
verb
1
2
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To interrupt or cut off (the voice, for example).
verb
0
1
To kill by preventing respiration; smother or suffocate.
verb
0
1
To suppress or repress; hold back; check, stop, inhibit, etc.

To stifle a sob, to stifle protests.

verb
0
1
To die from lack of air.
verb
0
1
To suffer from lack of fresh, cool air.
verb
0
1
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The kneelike joint above the hock in the hind leg of a horse, dog, etc.
noun
0
1
The joint of the hind leg analogous to the human knee in certain quadrupeds, such as the horse.
noun
0
1
A hind knee of various mammals, especially horses.
noun
0
1
(veterinary medicine) A bone disease of this region.
noun
0
1
To interrupt or cut off.
verb
0
1
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The heat was stifling the children.

verb
0
1
(intransitive) To feel smothered etc.

The heat felt stifling.

verb
0
1
(intransitive) To die of suffocation.

Two firemen tragically stifled in yesterday's fire when trying to rescue an old lady from her bedroom.

verb
0
1
To treat a silkworm cocoon with steam as part of the process of silk production.
verb
0
1

Origin of stifle

  • Middle English stifilen alteration (influenced by Old Norse stīfla to stop up) of stuffen, stuflen to stifle, choke, drown from Old French estoufer of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English possibly from Old French estivel pipe, leg, tibia from Latin stīpes stick

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English stiflen, from Old Norse stífla (“to dam, choke, stop up"), from stífla (“dam"), from Proto-Germanic *stÄ«filaz, *stÄ«filÄ… (“prop, pole, support"), from Proto-Indo-European *steip-, *steib- (“stake, picket"). Cognate with Icelandic stífla (“to dam up, jam, block"), Norwegian stivla (“to dam up, choke, stop"), Low German stipel (“support wood"), Eastern Frisian stÄ«pe (“stake, support").

    From Wiktionary