Smother meaning

smŭthər
The definition of smother is to suffocate someone by covering their nose and mouth to cut off air, to cover something entirely, or to making someone feel trapped and overwhelmed by attention and affection.

An example of smother is when you cover someone's face with a pillow and prevent them from breathing until they die.

An example of smother is when you cover your ice cream entirely with hot fudge.

An example of smother is when you call your boyfriend every 15 minutes, show up unannounced at his house all the time and constantly send him little gifts.

verb
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To cover thickly.

Smother chicken in sauce.

verb
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To be concealed or suppressed.
verb
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To conceal, suppress, or hide.

Management smothered the true facts of the case. We smothered our indignation and pressed onward.

verb
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To be surfeited with an emotion.
verb
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Something, such as a dense cloud of smoke or dust, that smothers or tends to smother.
noun
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To cover (a fire), excluding air from it and causing it to smolder or die down.
verb
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To cover over thickly.

Liver smothered in onions.

verb
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To hide or suppress by or as by covering; stifle.

To smother a yawn.

verb
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To overwhelm, dominate, suppress, or impede in a manner regarded as suffocating.

A child smothered with affection.

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To be hidden, stifled, or suppressed.
verb
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Dense, suffocating smoke or any thick cloud of dust, steam, fog, etc.
noun
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A confused turmoil; welter.
noun
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A smoldering fire.
noun
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A smoldering state or condition.
noun
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To suffocate; stifle; obstruct, more or less completely, the respiration of.
verb
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To extinguish or deaden, as fire, by covering, overlaying, or otherwise excluding the air: as, to smother a fire with ashes.
verb
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To reduce to a low degree of vigor or activity; suppress or do away with; extinguish; stifle; cover up; conceal; hide: as, the committee's report was smothered.
verb
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In cookery: to cook in a close dish: as, beefsteak smothered with onions.
verb
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To daub or smear.
verb
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(intransitive) To be suffocated.
verb
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(intransitive) To breathe with great difficulty by reason of smoke, dust, close covering or wrapping, or the like.
verb
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(intransitive) Of a fire: to burn very slowly for want of air; smolder.
verb
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(intransitive) Figuratively: to perish, grow feeble, or decline, by suppression or concealment; be stifled; be suppressed or concealed.
verb
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(soccer) To get in the way of a kick of the ball.
verb
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(Australian rules football) To get in the way of a kick of the ball, preventing it going very far. When a player is kicking the ball, an opponent who is close enough will reach out with his hands and arms to get over the top of it, so the ball hits his hands after leaving the kicker's boot, dribbling away.
verb
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That which smothers or appears to smother, particularly.
noun
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To lavish a surfeit of a given emotion on (someone).

The grandparents smothered the child with affection.

verb
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Origin of smother

  • Middle English smotheren from smorther dense smoke smolder

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English smothren, smortheren, alteration (due to smother, smorther (“a suffocating vapour, dense smoke", noun)) of Middle English smoren (“to smother"), from Old English smorian (“to smother, suffocate, choke"), from Proto-Germanic *smurōnÄ… (“to suffocate, strangle"). Cognate with Middle Low German smoren, smurten (“to choke, suffocate"), West Flemish smoren (“to smoke, reek"), Dutch smoren (“to suffocate, smother", also "to stew, simmer"), German schmoren (“to stew, simmer, braise").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English smother, smorther (“a suffocating vapour, dense smoke"), from Old English *smorþor (“smoke", literally “that which suffocates"), from smorian (“to suffocate, choke") + -þor (instrumental suffix).

    From Wiktionary