Stoke meaning

stōk
Stoke is defined as to stir up, or feed with fuel or food.

An example of stoke is to feed wood to a fire.

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The definition of a stoke is a measurement of the resistance of a liquid to flow, calculated by the viscosity of a the liquid (measured in poises), divided by the density of the liquid (expressed in grams per cubic centimeter).

An example of a stoke is a measurement of how resistant a liquid is to flow based on the centimetre-gram-second (CGS) system.

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To stir up and feed (a fire or furnace).
verb
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To feed fuel to and tend the fire of (a furnace).
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To feed or tend a furnace or fire.
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To eat steadily and in large quantities.
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To stir up and feed fuel to (a fire, furnace, etc.)
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To tend (a furnace, boiler, etc.)
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To feed or eat large quantities of food; fill (up)
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A basic unit in the CGS system, equal to the viscosity of a fluid, measured in poises, divided by the density of the fluid, measured in grams per cubic centimeter (0.0001 square meter per second): abbrev. St.
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verb
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To feed, stir up, especially, a fire or furnace.
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(intransitive) To attend to or supply a furnace with fuel; to act as a stoker or fireman.
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To stick; to thrust; to stab.
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(physics) Common misspelling of stokes. (A unit of kinematic viscosity equal to that of a fluid with a viscosity of one poise and a density of one gram per millilitre)
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Origin of stoke

  • Back-formation from stoker
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English stoken, from Middle Dutch stoken (“to poke, thrust") or Middle Low German stoken (“to poke, thrust"), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *stukōnÄ… (“to be stiff, push"), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)teug- (“to push, beat"). Cognate with Middle High German stoken (“to pierce, jab"), Norwegian Nynorsk stauka (“to push, thrust"). Alternative etymology derives the Middle English word from Old French estoquer, estochier (“to thrust, strike"), from the same Germanic source. More at stock.
    From Wiktionary
  • From a back-formation of stoker, apparently from Dutch stoker, from Dutch stoken (“to kindle a fire, incite, instigate"), from Middle Dutch stoken (“to poke, thrust"), from stock (“stick, stock"), see: tandenstoker. Ultimately the same word as above.
    From Wiktionary
  • Misconstruction of stokes
    From Wiktionary