Pote meaning

To poke (with a stick etc.).
verb
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1420, City of London (England). Corporation, Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls Preserved Among the Archives of the Corporation of the City of London at the Guild-hall, volume 1413-1437, The University Press, published 1943, page 75.

One gown of blue colour furred with potes of calabre, 28

noun
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1481, William Carton, “68: Godfrey is wounded by a Bear.”, in Mary Noyes Colvin, PhD. editor, Godeffroy of Boloyne; or, The siege and conqueste of Jerusalem, London: Published for the Early English Text Society by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., translation of original by William of Tyre, published 1893, page 113.

... the beeste ... embraced hym with his potes, or feet to fore...

noun
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1497, “Will of R. Burton”, in Susan Flood editor, St. Albans Wills 1471-1500, Hertfordshire Record Society, published 1993, page 141.

My wife's blewe gowne engrayned furred with powtes.

noun
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1612, Andrew Halyburton, “On Imports”, in Cosmo Nelson Innes editor, Ledger of Andrew Halyburton 1492-1503, published 1867, Book of Customs and Valuation of Merchandises, Anno. 1612, page 306.

Foynes—backes the dozen ... tailes the pane or mantle ... powtes the hundreth.

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(rare or archaic) Alternative spelling of poete.
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Origin of pote

  • From Middle English poten, from Old English potian (“to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad”), from Proto-Germanic *putōną (“to stab, push, poke”). Cognate with Dutch poten (“to plant”), Norwegian pota (“to poke”). More at put.
    From Wiktionary
  • Noun form from the word for paw in either Middle Dutch (poot, pote), Middle Low German (pōte), or Middle French (pote).
    From Wiktionary