Tyrant meaning

tī'rənt
An extremely oppressive, unjust, or cruel ruler.
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An absolute ruler who governs without restrictions, especially one who seized power illegally.
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An absolute ruler; specif., in ancient Greece, etc., one who seized sovereignty illegally; usurper.
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An oppressive, harsh, arbitrary person.

My boss is a tyrant.

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Any person who exercises authority in an oppressive manner; cruel master.
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The definition of a tyrant is a cruel ruler or authority figure.

An example of a tyrant was Joseph Stalin.

noun
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(historical, ancient Greece) A usurper; one who gains power and rules extralegally, distinguished from kings elevated by election or succession.
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A tyrannical influence.
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A cruel, oppressive ruler; despot.
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1382, Wycliffe's Bible, Dan."‰I"‰3

The sonys of Yrael, and of the kyngus bloode, and the children of tyrauntis.

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(by extension) Any person who abuses the power of position or office to treat others unjustly, cruelly, or harshly.
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(by extension) A villain; a person or thing who uses strength or violence to treat others unjustly, cruelly, or harshly.
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(ornithology) The tyrant birds, members of the family Tyrannidæ, which often fight or drive off other birds which approach their nests.
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(obsolete) To act like a tyrant; to be tyrannical.

verb
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1737, William Whiston translating Josephus, History of the Jewish Wars, I"‰xii"‰Â§2

Cassius... set tyrants over all Syria.

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(uncommon) Tyrannical, tyrannous; like, characteristic of, or in the manner of a tyrant.
  • 1775, Abigail Adams, letter in Familiar Letters of John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams, during the Revolution (1876), 124.
    ...a reconciliation between our no longer parent state, but tyrant state, and these colonies.

C."‰1600, William Shakespeare, As you Like it, I"‰ii"‰278Thus must I from the smoake into the smother,From tyrant Duke, vnto a tyrant Brother.

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Origin of tyrant

  • Middle English from Old French alteration of tyran from Latin tyrannus from Greek turannos
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English tyrant and tyrante, from Old French tyrant, from the addition of a terminal -t to Old French tiran (cp. French tyran) via a back-formation related to the development of French present participles out of the Latin -ans form, from Latin tyrannus (“despot"), from Ancient Greek τύραννος (turannos, “usurper, monarch, despot"), of uncertain origin.
    From Wiktionary