Mobile meaning

mō'bəl, -bēl', -bīl'
Flowing freely; fluid.

A mobile liquid.

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A type of sculpture consisting of carefully equilibrated parts that move, especially in response to air currents.
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A mobile phone.
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A city of southwest Alabama at the mouth of the Mobile River, about 61 km (38 mi) long, on the north shore of Mobile Bay, an arm of the Gulf of Mexico. Founded c. 1710, the city was held by the French, British, and Spanish until it was seized by US forces in 1813. In the Battle of Mobile Bay (August 1864), Adm. David Farragut defeated a major Confederate flotilla and secured Union control of the area.
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Very fluid, as mercury.
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Capable of changing rapidly or easily, as in response to different moods, feelings, conditions, needs, or influences; flexible, adaptable, etc.
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Of or having to do with wireless communications services, devices, etc., esp. cell phones.
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That is or has to do with a mobile or mobiles.
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A piece of abstract sculpture which aims to depict movement, i.e., kinetic rather than static rhythms, as by an arrangement of thin forms, rings, rods, etc. balanced and suspended in midair and set in motion by air currents.
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Seaport in SW Ala., on Mobile Bay.
proper name
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River in SW Ala., formed by the Alabama & Tombigbee rivers & flowing into Mobile Bay: c. 45 mi (72 km)
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Motorized vehicle designed for a (specified) purpose.

Bookmobile, snowmobile.

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Remote, portable, on-the-go. A "mobile" or "mobile device" is generally a cellphone, smartphone or tablet. When referring to the entire portable world, the term may include netbooks and laptops. See mobile platform, mobile compatibility, online app store and mobile website.
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Easily movable.
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In telecommunications, able to maintain a connection while in motion. Some RF-based wireless technologies support mobile communications. Cordless telephony, for example, allows the user to establish and maintain a connection while in motion, as long as the telephone is within range of the base station (BS). Cellular telephony not only allows the user to establish and maintain a connection while in motion, as long as the mobile station (MS) is within range of a base station, but also can accomplish call hand-offs to seamlessly transfer the call between base stations as the user moves from one cell to another cell. See also cellular, cordless telephony, and RF.
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Referring to a mobile phone, or cellular telephone. In some parts of the world the slang term for such a phone is mobile (pronounced "MO-byle," at least in Great Britain). In other parts of the world, the slang term is simply cell. See also cellular radio.
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Capable of being moved.
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By agency of mobile phones.
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Characterized by an extreme degree of fluidity; moving or flowing with great freedom.

Mercury is a mobile liquid.

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Easily moved in feeling, purpose, or direction; excitable; changeable; fickle.

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Changing in appearance and expression under the influence of the mind.

Mobile features.

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(biology) Capable of being moved, aroused, or excited; capable of spontaneous movement.
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A sculpture or decorative arrangement made of items hanging so that they can move independently from each other .
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A mobile phone .
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Something that can move.
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A city in southwest Alabama.
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The definition of mobile is someone or something that is moving, able to move or is being moved.

An example of mobile is a cellular phone.

An example of mobile is a person who has access to a car.

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Origin of mobile

  • < Fr < AmInd < ?
    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French from Latin mōbilis from movibilis from movēre to move meuə- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mōbilis (“easy to be moved, moveable"), from moveō (“move").
    From Wiktionary