Bridge meaning

brĭj
A thing that provides connection, contact, or transition.

A common language is a bridge between cultures.

noun
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To build a bridge over.
verb
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A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway.
noun
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The definition of a bridge is a structure connecting two sections of land so that people and vehicles can cross from one side to the other.

The Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco is a famous example of a bridge.

noun
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Something resembling or analogous to this structure in form or function.

A land bridge between the continents; a bridge of understanding between two countries.

noun
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An arch or superstructure.
  • (nautical) An elevated platform above the upper deck of a mechanically propelled ship from which it is navigated and from which all activities on deck can be seen and controlled by the captain, etc; smaller ships have a wheelhouse, and sailing ships were controlled from a quarterdeck.
    The first officer is on the bridge.
  • (music) The piece, on string instruments, that supports the strings from the sounding board.
  • (billiards, snooker, pool) A particular form of one hand placed on the table to support the cue when making a shot in cue sports.
  • (billiards, snooker, pool) A cue modified with a convex arch-shaped notched head attached to the narrow end, used to support a player's (shooter's) cue for extended or tedious shots. Also called a spider.
  • Anything supported at the ends and serving to keep some other thing from resting upon the object spanned, as in engraving, watchmaking, etc., or which forms a platform or staging over which something passes or is conveyed.
  • (wrestling) A defensive position in which the wrestler is supported by his feet and head, belly-up, in order to prevent touch-down of the shoulders and eventually to dislodge an opponent who has established a position on top.
noun
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Any of various card games, for two pairs of players, that developed from whist; esp., contract bridge.
noun
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A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
noun
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(chemistry) An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.
noun
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(1) To cross from one circuit, channel or element over to another.
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A simple, protocol-specific device that interconnects two or more links in a circuit, reading the destination address of an incoming data frame and forwarding to the next link in the direction of the target device. A bridge also acts as a repeater, amplifying, reshaping, and retiming the input signal. A bridge does not perform complex processes on the data frames, and neither does it attempt to evaluate the network as a whole to make end-to-end routing decisions.
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A simple, protocol-specific device that interconnects two or more segments in a local area network (LAN), or two or more LANs of the same architecture (e.g., Ethernet-to-Ethernet).A bridge reads the destination address of an incoming data frame and forwards it to the next segment in the direction of the target device. A bridge also acts as a repeater, amplifying, reshaping and retiming the input signal to extend the physical reach of the LAN. Bridges operate at the lower two layers of the OSI Reference Model, providing Physical Layer and Data Link Layer connectivity. Specific bridge protocols include source routing protocol (SRP), source routing transparent (SRT), spanning tree protocol (STP). See also architecture, circuit, Data Link Layer, encapsulating bridge, filtering bridge, frame, LAN, link, OSI Reference Model, Physical Layer, protocol, repeater, router, self-learning bridge, SRP, SRT, and STP.
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  • ​(anatomy) The upper bony ridge of the human nose.
    Rugby players often break the bridge of their noses.
  • (dentistry) A prosthesis replacing one or several adjacent teeth.
    The dentist pulled out the decayed tooth and put in a bridge.

The rope bridge crosses the river.

noun
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A connection, real or abstract.
  • (medicine) A rudimentary procedure before definite solution.
    ECMO is used as a bridge to surgery to stabilize the patient.
  • (computing) A device which connects two or more computer buses, typically in a transparent manner.
    This chip is the bridge between the front-side bus and the I/O bus.
  • (communication) A system which connects two or more local area networks at layer 2.
    The LAN bridge uses a spanning tree algorithm.
  • (chemistry) An intramolecular valence bond, atom or chain of atoms that connects two different parts of a molecule; the atoms so connected being bridgeheads.
  • (electronics) An unintended solder connection between two or more components or pins.
  • (music) A song contained within another song, often demarcated by meter, key, or melody.
    The lyrics in the song's bridge inverted its meaning.
  • (graph theory) An edge which, if removed, changes a connected graph to one that is not connected.
  • (poetry) A point in a line where a break in a word unit cannot occur.
  • (diplomacy) A statement, such as an offer, that signals a possibility of accord.
noun
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To be or make a bridge over something.

With enough cable, we can bridge this gorge.

verb
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To span as if with a bridge.

The two groups were able to bridge their differences.

verb
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(music) To transition from one piece or section of music to another without stopping.

We need to bridge that jam into "The Eleven".

verb
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(computing, communication) To connect two or more computer buses, networks etc. with a bridge.
verb
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(wrestling) To go to the bridge position.
verb
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(card games) A card game played with four players playing as two teams of two players each.

Bidding is an essential element of the game bridge.

noun
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Bridge is defined as the bony upper part of your nose.

An example of the bridge of your nose is the place where your glasses rest on your nose.

noun
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A fixed or removable replacement for one or several but not all of the natural teeth, usually anchored at each end to a natural tooth.
noun
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(nautical) A crosswise platform or enclosed area above the main deck of a ship from which the ship is controlled.
noun
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(chemistry) An intramolecular connection that spans atoms or groups of atoms.
noun
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To cross by or as if by a bridge.
verb
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Any of several card games derived from whist, usually played by four people in two partnerships, in which trump is determined by bidding and the hand opposite the declarer is played as a dummy.
noun
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A structure built over a river, railroad, highway, etc. to provide a way across for vehicles or pedestrians.
noun
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An overhead framework across sets of railroad tracks, for carrying signals; gantry.
noun
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A raised structure on a ship, usually in the forward part, from which it is controlled while underway.
noun
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A dividing partition for keeping fuel in place in a furnace or boiler.
noun
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noun
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(dentistry) A fixed or removable mounting for a false tooth or teeth, attached to a real tooth or teeth.
noun
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(elec.) A device used primarily in measuring resistances, frequencies, etc., by comparing the effect of the unknown element with that of known or standard elements in the circuit.
noun
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(music) A connecting passage between two sections of a composition.
noun
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To build a bridge on or over.
verb
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To provide a bridge, connection, transition, etc. across or between.
verb
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Designating or of products priced between the least expensive and the premium.

A bridge line.

adjective
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A structure spanning and providing passage over a gap or barrier, such as a river or roadway.
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(electronics) Any of several electrical devices that measure characteristics such as impedance and inductance by balancing different parts of a circuit.
noun
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A low wall or vertical partition in the fire chamber of a furnace, for deflecting flame, etc.; a bridge wall.
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A solid crust of undissolved salt in a water softener.
noun
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burn one's bridges (behind one)
  • to commit oneself to a course from which there is no retreat
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

burn one's bridges (behind one)

Origin of bridge

  • From earlier biritch (influenced by bridge) from Russian birich a call from Old Russian birichĭ

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English brigge from Old English brycg bhrū- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English brigge, from Old English brycġ (“bridge”), from Proto-Germanic *brugjō, *brugjǭ (“bridge”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerw-, *bʰrēw- (“wooden flooring, decking, bridge”). Cognate with Scots brig, brigg, breeg (“bridge”), Saterland Frisian Brääch (“bridge”), West Frisian brêge (“bridge”), Dutch brug (“bridge”), German Brücke (“bridge”), Danish bro (“bridge”) and brygge (“wharf”), Icelandic brú (“bridge”) and brygga (“pier”), Gaulish bríva (“bridge”), Old Church Slavonic бръвъно (brŭvŭno, “beam”) and Russian бревно (brevnó, “log”).

    From Wiktionary

  • The verb is from Middle English briggen, from Old English brycġian (“to bridge, make a causeway, pave”), derived from the noun. Cognate with Dutch bruggen (“to bridge”), Middle Low German bruggen (“to bridge”), Old High German bruccōn (“to bridge”) (whence Modern German brücken).

    From Wiktionary

  • Name of an older card game biritch, probably Russian бирич (biríč) - OED, or probably from Turkish bir-üç, "one-three".

    From Wiktionary