Obligate meaning

ŏblĭ-gāt
To obligate is to bind by a duty, promise or a contract.

When you require your staff to attend a weekly meeting, this is an example of a time when you obligate the staff to attend a meeting.

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To compel or constrain by a social, legal, or moral requirement.
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To cause to be grateful or indebted; oblige.

We will always be obligated to you for your kindness.

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To commit (money, for example) in order to fulfill an obligation.
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Able to exist or survive only in a particular environment or by assuming a particular role.

An obligate parasite; an obligate anaerobe.

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An obligate organism.
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To bind by a contract, promise, sense of duty, etc.; put under obligation.
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Bound; obliged.
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Limited to a certain type of behavior, environment, etc.

An obligate parasite.

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Able to exist or survive only in a particular environment or by assuming a particular role.

An obligate parasite; an obligate anaerobe.

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An obligate organism.
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Capable of existing only in a particular environment or by assuming a particular role. An obligate aerobe, such as certain bacteria, can live only in the presence of oxygen. An obligate parasite cannot survive independently of its host.
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(North America, Scotland) To bind, compel, constrain, or oblige by a social, legal, or moral tie.
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(North America, Scotland) To cause to be grateful or indebted; to oblige.
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(North America, Scotland) To commit (money, for example) in order to fulfill an obligation.
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(biology) Able to exist or survive only in a particular environment or by assuming a particular role.

An obligate parasite; an obligate anaerobe.

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Origin of obligate

  • Latin obligāre obligāt- oblige

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin obligātus, past participle of obligō.

    From Wiktionary