Drug meaning

drŭg
A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
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Any substance used as a medicine or as an ingredient in a medicine, which kills or inactivates germs or affects any bodily function or organ.
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A chemical substance, such as a narcotic or hallucinogen, that affects the central nervous system, causing changes in behavior and often addiction.
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A chemical substance, especially one prescribed by a medical provider, that is used in the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of a condition or disease. Drugs are prescribed for a limited amount of time, as for an acute infection, or on a regular basis for chronic disorders, such as hypertension.
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A narcotic, hallucinogen, etc., esp. one that is habit-forming.
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To put a harmful drug in (a food, drink, etc.)
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To administer a drug to.
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A chemical substance such as a narcotic or a hallucinogen that affects the central nervous system and is used recreationally for perceived desirable effects on personality, perception, or behavior. Many recreational drugs are used illicitly and can be addictive.
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To drug is defined as to give someone medication or to poison with an addictive and dangerous substance.

An example of to drug is for a doctor to give Novocaine.

An example of to drug is to put cocaine into someone's drink.

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To poison or mix (food or drink) with a drug.
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Any substance used in chemistry, dyeing, etc.
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To stupefy with or as with a drug.
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To administer a drug to, especially to treat pain or induce anesthesia.
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To give a drug to, especially surreptitiously, in order to induce stupor.
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A chemical or organic substance used to treat a medical or psychological condition; such a substance used illegally to alter consciousness or mood.
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The act of giving someone such a substance, with the implication that it is against the recipient’s will and has an adverse effect. See also controlled substance.
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(pharmacology) A substance used to treat an illness, relieve a symptom, or modify a chemical process in the body for a specific purpose.

Aspirin is a drug that reduces pain, acts against inflammation and lowers body temperature.

The revenues from both brand-name drugs and generic drugs have increased.

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A psychoactive substance, especially one which is illegal and addictive, ingested for recreational use, such as cocaine.
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Anything, such as a substance, emotion, or action, to which one is addicted.
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Any commodity that lies on hand, or is not salable; an article of slow sale, or in no demand.
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To administer intoxicating drugs to, generally without the recipient's knowledge or consent.

She suddenly felt strange, and only then realized she'd been drugged.

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To add intoxicating drugs to with the intention of drugging someone.

She suddenly felt strange. She realized her drink must have been drugged.

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(intransitive) To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines.

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(Southern US) Simple past tense and past participle of drag.

You look like someone drug you behind a horse for half a mile.

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(obsolete) A drudge.

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The definition of a drug is a medication or an addictive substance.

An example of a drug is an antibiotic.

An example of a drug is marijuana.

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A chemical or dye.
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drug on the market
  • A commodity for which there is little or no demand because the supply is so plentiful.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of drug

  • Middle English drogge from Old French drogue drug perhaps from Middle Dutch droge (vate) dry (cases) pl. of drog dry
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English drogge (“medicine”), from Middle French drogue (“cure, pharmaceutical product”), from Old French drogue, drocque (“tincture, pharmaceutical product”), from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German droge, as in droge vate (“dry vats, dry barrels”), mistaking droge for the contents, which were wontedly dried herbs, plants or wares. Droge comes from Middle Dutch drōghe (“dry”), from Old Dutch drōgi (“dry”), from Proto-Germanic *draugiz (“dry, hard”). Cognate with English dry, Dutch droog (“dry”), German trocken (“dry”).
    From Wiktionary
  • Germanic ablaut formation, cognate with Dutch droeg, German trug, Swedish drog, Old English drōg.
    From Wiktionary