Charity meaning

chăr'ĭ-tē
Something given to help the needy; alms.
noun
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Benevolence or generosity toward others or toward humanity.
noun
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An institution, organization, or fund established to help the needy.
noun
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Provision of help or relief to the poor; almsgiving.
noun
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Indulgence or forbearance in judging others.
noun
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The theological virtue defined as love directed first toward God but also toward oneself and one's neighbors as objects of God's love.
noun
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(archaic) Christian love; representing God's love of man, man's love of God, or man's love of his fellow-men.
noun
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The love of God for humanity, or a love of one's fellow human beings.
noun
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Kindness or leniency in judging others.
noun
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The feeling of goodwill; benevolence.
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The definition of charity is an act or feeling of kindness or goodwill or a voluntary gift of money or time to those in need.

An example of charity is a donation of ten dollars a month to a local food bank.

noun
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A welfare institution, organization, or fund.
noun
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A feminine name.
noun
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(uncountable) Benevolence to others less fortunate than ourselves; the providing of goods or money to those in need.
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(countable) The goods or money given to those in need.
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(countable) An organization, the objective of which is to carry out a charitable purpose.
noun
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A female given name.
pronoun
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An act of goodwill or affection.
noun
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In general, an attitude of kindness and understanding towards others, now especially suggesting generosity.

Judge thyself with the judgment of sincerity, and thou will judge others with the judgment of charity. — John Mitchell Mason.

noun
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Origin of charity

  • Middle English charite from Old French Christian love from Latin cāritās affection from cārus dear kā- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From charity in the biblical sense of Christian love; first used by Puritans. In early Christian tradition, Faith, Hope and Charity were the martyred daughters of Saint Sophia. The names, taken from 1 Corinthians 13:13 (And now abideth faith, hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is charity) have been translated and used in many languages.
    From Wiktionary
  • From Old French charité (French: charité), from Latin caritas.
    From Wiktionary