Duct meaning

dŭkt
Frequency:
The definition of a duct is a tube, channel or passage that gas or liquid move through.

An example of a duct is the piping through which air conditioning enters into an office.

noun
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An often enclosed passage or channel for conveying a substance, especially a liquid or gas.
noun
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(anatomy) A tubular bodily canal or passage, especially one for carrying a glandular secretion.

A tear duct.

noun
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A tube or pipe for enclosing electrical cables or wires.
noun
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To channel through a duct.

Duct the moist air away.

verb
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To supply with ducts.
verb
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A tube, channel, or canal through which a gas or liquid moves.
noun
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A conducting tubule in plant tissues, esp. one containing resin, latex, etc.
noun
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A pipe or conduit through which wires or cables are run, air is circulated or exhausted, etc.
noun
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An often enclosed passage or channel for conveying a substance, especially a liquid or gas.
noun
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(anatomy) A tubular bodily canal or passage, especially one for carrying a glandular secretion.

A tear duct.

noun
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A tube or tubelike structure through which something flows, especially a tube in the body for carrying a fluid secreted that is by a gland.
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A tube, pipe, channel, or conduit through which a gas or liquid flows or through which cables or wires are run. See also duct tape.
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A pipe, tube or canal which carries air or liquid from one place to another.

Heating and air-conditioning ducts.

noun
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A tube in the body for the passage of excretions or secretions.

A tear duct, bile duct.

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An enclosure or channel for electrical cable runs.
noun
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To channel something through a duct (series of ducts)
verb
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Origin of duct

  • Latin ductus act of leading from past participle of dūcere to lead deuk- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin ductus, noun use of past participle of dūcere (“to lead, draw”). Compare douit.

    From Wiktionary