Sequence meaning

sē'kwəns, -kwĕns'
To organize or arrange in a sequence.
verb
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A resulting event; consequence; sequel.
noun
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A succession of scenes constituting a single, uninterrupted episode.
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The linear order of bases in a nucleic acid or of amino acids in a protein.
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An ordered set of quantities or elements.
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The repetition of a melodic pattern in the same voice part but at different pitch levels.
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An ordered set of quantities, as x, 2 x2 , 3 x3 , 4 x4 .
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The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
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To determine the order of constituents in (a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule).
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A continuous or related series, often of uniform things.

A sonnet sequence.

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Three or more playing cards in unbroken order in the same suit; run.
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A hymn coming immediately before the Gospel in certain Masses.
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To arrange in a sequence; put in order.
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To find the unique order of (structural units of a gene, protein, etc.) by chemical analysis.
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A following of one thing after another; succession.
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An order of succession; an arrangement.
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The order of constituents in a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
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To organize or arrange in a sequence.
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To determine the order of constituents in a polymer, such as a nucleic acid or protein molecule.
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A set of quantities ordered in the same manner as the positive integers, in which there is always the same relation between each quantity and the one succeeding it. A sequence can be finite, such as {1, 3, 5, 7, 9}, or it can be infinite, such as {1,1 /2 ,1 /3 ,1 /4 , ...1 /n }.
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The order of subunits that make up a polymer, especially the order of nucleotides in a nucleic acid or of the amino acids in a protein.
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To determine the order of subunits of a polymer.
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A set of things next to each other in a set order; a series.
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A series of musical phrases where a theme or melody is repeated, with some change each time, such as in pitch or length (example: opening of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony).
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A musical composition used in some Catholic Masses between the readings. The most famous sequence is the Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) formerly used in funeral services.
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(mathematics) An ordered list of objects.
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(now rare) A subsequent event; a consequence or result.
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A series of shots that depict a single action or style in a film, television show etc.
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(card games) A meld consisting of three or more cards of successive ranks in the same suit, such as the four, five and six of hearts.
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To arrange in an order.
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To determine the order of things, especially of amino acids in a protein, or of bases in a nucleic acid.
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To produce (music) with a sequencer.
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Sequence is a specific order in which things occur.

An example of a sequence is a TV show with a beginning, middle and end.

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A following of one thing after another; succession.
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An order of succession; an arrangement.
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A related or continuous series.
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Three or more playing cards in consecutive order; a run.
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A series of related shots that constitute a complete unit of action in a movie.
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A melodic or harmonic pattern successively repeated at different pitches with or without a key change.
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A hymn sung between the gradual and the Gospel.
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Origin of sequence

  • Middle English a type of hymn from Old French from Medieval Latin sequentia hymn, that which follows (from its following the alleluia) from Late Latin from Latin sequēns sequent- present participle of sequī to follow sekw-1 in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English sequence, from Old French sequence (“a sequence of cards, answering verses"), from Late Latin sequentia (“a following"), from Latin sequens (“following"), from sequi (“to follow"); see sequent.
    From Wiktionary